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Бакалавриат 2019/2020

Академическое письмо на английском языке

Статус: Факультатив (Социология)
Направление: 39.03.01. Социология
Когда читается: 4-й курс, 1-3 модуль
Формат изучения: Full time
Язык: русский
Кредиты: 2

Программа дисциплины

Аннотация

The course is designed to assist 4th year undergraduate students in writing and preparing to defend their Project Proposal in English. The three main elements of the course are: a Literature review; a Project Proposal (of which the Lit review is a part, although it gets marked separately); and the preparation for the oral defense of own Project Proposal. In addition, you will have to do several home tasks in modules 1-2 and do a -10-minute presentation of your project proposal in module 3. The course is taught in English. Expected level of English is B2 or upper-intermediate, as per the CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference for languages).
Цель освоения дисциплины

Цель освоения дисциплины

  • The aim of the course “Academic Writing in English” is three-fold: 1) to provide students with techniques that can help them organize and structure their ideas in a coherent way (e.g. to follow the rule of one main idea per paragraph; ensure paragraphs are logically linked); 2) to do practical exercises that help students work with texts in English (e.g. write short summaries of paragraphs or larger parts of texts using paraphrases for a literature review); 3) to teach students the vocabulary commonly used in academic writing and the basics of academic oral presentation.
Результаты освоения дисциплины

Результаты освоения дисциплины

  • By the end of this class, students will have discussed with the Instructor any issues related to their individual writing.
  • By the end of this class, students will have discussed with the Instructor common weaknesses and strengths as well as comments for individual works.
  • By the end of this class, students will have leaned how to organize ideas in a literature review in accordance with a chronological or thematic pattern.
  • By the end of this class, students will have learned and practiced vocabulary and techniques used to highlight one’s (research) contribution and argument.
  • By the end of this class, students will have learned several techniques for how to make notes and write summaries from multiple sources
  • By the end of this class, students will have learned several techniques for how to make notes and write summaries from one source.
  • By the end of this class, students will have practiced how to provide context to own research or how to write the part of the Introduction referred to as Background to the research problem.
  • By the end of this class, students will have practices several techniques for presenting evidence in own writing.
  • By the end of this class, students will know how to paraphrase other people’s ideas; understand how to use direct quotes from sources; and know when and how to reference sources in the text.
  • By the end of this class, the students will have a clear idea of the structure of the course, the main assignments, and requirements.
  • By the end of this class, the students will have discussed and practiced strategies for writing the Conclusion.
  • By the end of this class, the students will have discussed any issues related to their individual Project Proposals.
  • By the end of this class, the students will have discussed any issues related to writing own Project Proposal and giving a presentation based on it.
  • By the end of this class, the students will have discussed the requirements for the structure and contents of the Methodology section of the project proposal, and practiced writing this section for own project proposal.
  • By the end of this class, the students will have learned about the examination requirements for a presentation and a vocabulary for an academic presentation.
  • By the end of this class, the students will have learned which parts a coherent paragraph consists of, and have practiced writing up paragraphs on the topic of own project proposal.
  • By the end of this class, the students will have practiced given a presentation based on own Project Proposal.
  • By the end of this class, the students will have practiced giving a presentation based on own Project Proposal.
  • By the end of this class, the students will have practiced writing an Abstract for own Project Proposal.
  • By the end of this class, the students will have practiced: 1) ways to present anticipated findings to support own argument; 2) and how to discuss own findings in relation to those outlined in existing literature.
  • By the end of this class, the students will have studied and practiced how to write a ‘problem statement’, i.e. what questions the researcher wishes to answer or what problem(s) s/he wishes to solve in her/his research.
  • By the end of this class, the students will have studied rules of an academic discussion and practiced how to respond to ‘inconvenient’ questions.
  • By the end of this class, the students will have studies ways of outlining links between cause and effect in academic writing.
  • By the end of this class, the students will studied: 1) best ways of organizing and presenting information on slides; 2) academic vocabulary for introducing information on slides to the audience (e.g. graphs).
Содержание учебной дисциплины

Содержание учебной дисциплины

  • Introduction to the course.
    In the first class, we will talk about the content of the course and assignments. There are three main assignments which are being prepared throughout the course: 1) a 800-1000 word Literature review; 2) a Project proposal that should be about 800-1000 words long (this is excluding the Literature review for which you will have already received feedback by the time you will need to submit the Project proposal); 3) Presentation of an academic journal article; 4) an oral defense of the Project proposal (6-10 min) and a short discussion of the presented Proposal.
  • Constructing coherent paragraphs.
    This week we will talk about how we can build an ‘organic structure’ in our academic writing. That is, when each new point relates either directly to the last part of the previous point, or back to the main idea. We will focus on structuring paragraphs (e.g. identifying topic sentences, etc.).
  • Paraphrasing and citing other people’s ideas.
    What are the academic rules for using (citing) other people’s ideas? This question may sound easy, but it is crucial to make sure that you use and reference other people’s work correctly to avoid being accused of plagiarism. We’re going to: 1) do exercises that will help to paraphrase other people’s ideas; 2) do exercises that help us understand how to use direct quotes from sources; 3) discuss when and how to reference sources (e.g. in-text referencing convention- APA).
  • Making notes and writing a summary from one source
    Being able to produce summaries of what you’ve read is an important skill used in writing many kinds of academic texts, including essays, project proposals and research reports.
  • Writing summaries from multiple sources.
    This week the students practice to make notes and write summaries from more than one source. The class is designed to practice a skill that will also be used in the week devoted to writing a literature review, i.e. identifying similar and different points across sources and deciding on ways this information can be synthesised in a manner relevant to one’s own research question and argument.
  • Organizing ideas in a Lit review.
    This week focuses on selecting excerpts from relevant existing literature organizing ideas within a literature review. We will briefly discuss the two main types of literature reviews: chronological and thematic. We will also look at several examples of “synthesis matrix” to organize the sources in a literature review and integrate them into a unique interpretation. Elements that can be included in a matrix are: the purpose or research questions the authors posed; the method used in the study, etc.
  • Providing/presenting evidence.
    This week the students are encouraged to think whether evidence they present to the reader speaks for itself (note: this is not about the findings of your research, but about pieces of information you present in sentences/paragraphs to support claims you make, e.g. Childhood obesity in the UK is more of a problem now, compared to previous years. There is evidence that it leads to many diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and depression [in the 2nd sentence the reader expects to see evidence that supports the statement in the 1st sentence, but, instead, the author moves on to another idea]). Also, after an author introduces evidence into their writing, he/she has to say why and how this evidence supports their argument. In other words, you have to explain the significance of the evidence and its function in their paper. What turns a fact or piece of information into evidence is the connection it has with a larger claim or argument: evidence is always evidence for or against something, and the author has to make that link clear.
  • Expressing your voice and argument.
    The focus of this weeks’ class are ways to present own argument in an essay, paper or thesis. We will identify vocabulary and techniques used to highlight one’s contribution and argument. It is important to show that you are aware of counter-arguments. Without these your argument will appear one-sided. Example: Although it has been suggested that school uniforms make children more rebellious [counter-argument], it is generally agreed that uniforms develop a group identity [the author’s argument].
  • Individual consultations.
    Students come to discuss their progress with writing a Literature review for own research proposal.
  • Discussion of and feedback on the submitted Literature reviews.
    As students submit their Literature reviews at the end of module 1, in the first class after the break we discuss common weaknesses and strengths as well as comments for individual works.
  • Writing up an Introduction
    This class focuses on writing the Introduction to a Project proposal (and a thesis more broadly). We will discuss how to provide context to your own research or how to write the part of the Introduction referred to as Background to the research problem.
  • Writing up the Intro (cont.).
    Problem statement. This week we look at how to write a ‘problem statement’, i.e. what questions the researcher wishes to answer or what problem(s) s/he wishes to solve. This statement is a logical extension of the Introduction after the Background part.
  • Writing up the section on Methods
    This week, we will discuss the requirements for the structure and contents of the Methodology section of the project proposal. Students practice writing this section for own project proposal.
  • Hypotheses/Anticipated findings
    This week we practice ways to present anticipated findings to support own argument. We will do exercises that are designed to teach you how to discuss your own findings in relation to those outlined in existing literature (e.g. there is a table with information regarding the authors their claims and “your” findings; the task is to write several sentences comparing “your” findings with the authors’ findings).
  • Individual consultations.
  • Writing up the Conclusion.
    We will discuss strategies for writing the Conclusion. A conclusion is a commentary of what has been stated in the main part of an essay/thesis/paper. It can contain the following elements: i) comparisons with other studies ii) summary of main body iii) limitations of research iv) suggestions for further research v) practical implications and proposals.
  • Writing up the Abstract.
    We will do a series of exercises that will help you to produce a concise summary of your thesis. Writing the Abstract is useful for polishing your ideas and identifying weaknesses in the argument or its structure.
  • Individual consultations on Project Proposals.
  • Preparing for an oral presentation
    Examination requirements for a presentation. Vocabulary for an academic presentation.
  • Preparing slides for a presentation.
    This week, we discuss best ways of organizing and presenting information on slides. Academic vocabulary for introducing information on slides to the audience (e.g. graphs).
  • Answering questions after presentation.
    Rules of an academic discussion. How to respond to ‘inconvenient’ questions.
  • In-class presentation of an article.
    This is a practice for the oral defense of own Project Proposal. It is based on an academic peer-reviewed journal article related to own project (alternatively, you can choose to give presentation based on own PP). Duration: 5 min + answer to one-two questions. [The marking scheme is provided at the end of this Syllabus; it is identical to the one used for assessing the oral defense of the Project Proposal].
  • In-class presentation of an article (cont.).
    This is a practice for the oral defense of own Project Proposal. It is based on an academic peer-reviewed journal article related to own project (alternatively, you can choose to give presentation based on own PP). Duration: 5 min + answer to one-two questions. [The marking scheme is provided at the end of this Syllabus; it is identical to the one used for assessing the oral defense of the Project Proposal].
  • Elements of academic writing-1.
    This week we will consider ways of outlining links between cause and effect in academic writing. We will also look into what devices we can use if we need to examine a problem and evaluate possible solutions (e.g. in the literature review or in the anticipated findings/ discussion of findings).
  • Individual consultations for writing up the Project proposal and for giving presentations.
  • Individual consultations for writing up the Project proposal and for giving presentations.
Элементы контроля

Элементы контроля

  • Literature review (неблокирующий)
  • Individual in-class presentation (неблокирующий)
  • Project proposal (неблокирующий)
  • 7 Home tasks (неблокирующий)
    Students submit 3 small home tasks in Module 1 and 4 small home tasks in Module 2.
Промежуточная аттестация

Промежуточная аттестация

  • Промежуточная аттестация (3 модуль)
    0.2 * 7 Home tasks + 0.1 * Individual in-class presentation + 0.3 * Literature review + 0.4 * Project proposal
Список литературы

Список литературы

Рекомендуемая основная литература

  • Academic writing : a handbook for international students, Bailey S., ISBN: 978-0-415-59581-0, 2011
  • Academic writing course : study skills in English, Jordan R. R., ISBN: 0-582-40019-8, 2001
  • Academic writing for graduate students : essential tasks and skills, Swales J. M., Feak C. B., ISBN: 978-0-472-03475-8, 2012
  • Academic writing in a second or foreign language : issues and challenges facing ESL/EFL academic writers in higher education contexts, Tang R., ISBN: 978-1-441-11216-3, 2012
  • Commentary for Academic writing for graduate students: essential tasks and skills, Swales, J.M., Feak, Ch.B., ISBN: 978-0-472-03506-9, 2012
  • Effective academic writing 3 : the researched essay, Liss R., Davis J., ISBN: 978-0-19-432348-2, 2012
  • Steps to academic writing : with key, Barry M., ISBN: 978-0-521-18497-7, 2011
  • Stylish academic writing, Sword H., ISBN: 978-0-674-06448-5, 2012

Рекомендуемая дополнительная литература

  • A sequence for academic writing, Behrens L., Rosen L. J., Beedles B., ISBN: 0-321-20780-7, 2005
  • Academic writing course : study skills in English, Jordan R. R., ISBN: 0-582-40019-8, 1999
  • Academic writing course : study skills in English, Jordan R. R., ISBN: 0-582-40019-8, 2004
  • Commentary for academic writing for graduate students : essential tasks and skills, Swales J. M., Feak C. B., ISBN: 0-472-08857-2, 2007
  • Think about it : critical skills for academic writing, Mauk J., Stayer J., Mauk K., ISBN: 978-1-285-19384-7, 2014