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Магистратура 2021/2022

Современная англоязычная литература (20 -21 вв.)

Направление: 45.04.02. Лингвистика
Когда читается: 1-й курс, 3, 4 модуль
Формат изучения: с онлайн-курсом
Охват аудитории: для всех кампусов НИУ ВШЭ
Прогр. обучения: Иностранные языки и межкультурная коммуникация
Язык: английский
Кредиты: 5

Course Syllabus

Abstract

This survey course on the twentieth- and twenty-first-century British and American literature offers an opportunity to study writers and writing from cultures both united and divided by a common language, the English language. As far as literary production and traffic are concerned, the Atlantic Ocean does not form a barrier between the two cultures – quite the opposite, it is often impossible to fully understand contemporary British or American literature without knowing something of the other nation’s culture. Moreover, many writers from this robust period of literary production became expatriates, committed both to international artistic movements and to intellectual affairs of their native countries. Students who decide to join this course will explore British and American literature in all its major forms – prose, poetry and drama, relating it to key social and historical contexts. Through guided discussion and independent research, this course will enable students to study both British and American literature in equal depth, strengthen their ability to read and write critically about literary texts, and help them develop a deeper appreciation of both countries’ entwined literary history. To fulfill the requirements of the course students need to have a good command of written and spoken English (required CEFR language proficiency level is C1).
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • To broaden one’s knowledge about the body of written works produced in the English language by the inhabitants of the UK and the USA in the 20th and 21st centuries, putting it in the larger theoretical perspective of the history of ideas.
  • To increase one’s proficiency in critically reading, reflecting, analyzing, and interpreting a range of assigned Key Texts in the three main forms (prose, poetry, and drama) from a historical and contextual perspective, both orally and in writing.
  • To hone one’s Critical Reading, Critical Thinking, and Critical Writing skills necessary for advancing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text, which in its turn will enable students to communicate their own and other scholars’ interpretations of trends in the history of ideas and in literary texts, showing intercultural understanding and ethical awareness.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • To know key historical events, cultural developments, and artistic movements related to British and American literature at the turn of the 20th century; to read critically, comprehend, and produce clear, informed, independent opinions and judgements on the assigned Key Text(s); to formulate (both orally and in writing) arguable claims and react to others’ ideas about the assigned Key Text(s).
  • To know key historical events, cultural developments, and artistic movements related to British and American literature between World War I and World War II; to read critically, comprehend, and produce clear, informed, independent opinions and judgements on the assigned Key Text(s); to formulate (both orally and in writing) arguable claims and react to others’ ideas about the assigned Key Text(s).
  • To know key historical events, cultural developments, and artistic movements related to British and American literature from the late 1940s onwards; to read critically, comprehend, and produce clear, informed, independent opinions and judgements on the assigned Key Text(s); to formulate (both orally and in writing) arguable claims and react to others’ ideas about the assigned Key Text(s).
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • British and American literature before and during World War I
    1. Popular culture and “formula stories” (John G. Cawelty). Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories. The Golden Age of Detective Fiction. The American hard-boiled detective story. Dashiell Hammett’s Continental Op stories. 2. Pre-Modernism: Walt Whitman; Emily Dickinson; late Victorian poets (selected poems). 3. Early twentieth-century literary production across the Atlantic: literary networks, literary journals, and “little magazines.” 4. James Joyce, "Dubliners" (selected stories). 5. World War I and its aftermath: the Trench poets; modernist manifestos; Ezra Pound; Robert Frost (selected poems).
  • British and American literature of the interwar period
    6. The disillusionment of the “Lost Generation.” T.S. Eliot, "The Waste Land." 7. William Faulkner, “A Rose for Emily” and “Barn Burning”; Francis Scott Fitzgerald, “Babylon Revisited”; Ernest Hemingway, “The Snows of Kilimanjaro.” 8. Dystopian fiction: Aldous Huxley, "Brave New World." 9. John Steinbeck, "Of Mice and Men."
  • British and American literature from World War II and onwards
    10. World War II and its aftermath: Dylan Thomas; Philip Larkin; Ted Hughes; Sylvia Plath (selected poems). 11. Regional issues and identity: Hugh MacDiarmid, “The Watergaw” vs. “My Heart Always Goes Back to the North.” Post-World War II Southern Gothic: Flannery O’Connor, “A Good Man Is Hard to Find.” 12. The Beat Generation: Jack Kerouac, "Tristessa." 13. The Theatre of the Absurd: Tom Stoppard, "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead." 14. Postmodernism: John Barth, “The Literature of Exhaustion,” “The Literature of Replenishment,” “Lost in the Funhouse”; Ted Hughes, “Snow.” 15. Identity in contemporary British and American literature: Junot Díaz, "The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao"; Bernardine Evaristo, "Girl, Woman, Other."
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Seminar Attendance
    Active participation in group discussions and in-class assignments is required at every seminar. If a student actively participates in class discussions during 7 classes or more, they will get a +1 bonus point added to their scaled grade (масштабированная оценка). Students should inform their instructor about their excused absences before the class (not after) by email, and provide the doctor’s notes and other documents about them. An excused absence is an absence due to a number of accepted reasons such as a medical or personal issue beyond one’s control, participation in a significant extracurricular university event, conference etc. If the absence is excused, the grade for seminar attendance will not be reduced.
  • non-blocking Reading Journals
    There will be two compulsory written home assignments in the format of journal writing (analyzing selected poems of a given period: students might focus, for instance, on matters related to genre, on social issues and moral concerns, or on how language (imagery, rhythm, diction, syntax) generates meaning within a single poem). The Reading Journal entries should be typed and follow basic academic style conventions and formatting rules. Instructions will be given via Smart LMS per assignment.
  • non-blocking Essay 1
    The purpose of this literary analysis essay (3-5 A4 pages long PLUS a References page) is to carefully examine an aspect of a Key Text discussed during seminars 1–8 and to present an argument / claim about it. The list of topics and guidelines will be given via Smart LMS two weeks before the deadline. Each student must choose a topic from the list provided and write their essay during hours of self-guided work. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. For each plagiarized sentence, the student loses one point (for example, 8 → 7). If there are more than three plagiarized sentences in one’s work, the grade for the essay is a zero. The essay should be uploaded before the deadline. If one’s essay is late, it is not accepted or assessed – the grade is a zero. This paper should incorporate at least two additional sources. These sources may include critical perspectives, authorial commentaries, and / or historical assessments.
  • non-blocking Essay 2 (= Written Examination)
    The written examination consists of a literary analysis essay (3–5 A4 pages long PLUS a References page), the purpose of which is to carefully examine an aspect of a Key Text discussed in the course and to present an argument / claim about it. The list of topics and guidelines will be given via Smart LMS two weeks before the deadline. Each student taking the exam must choose a topic from the list provided and write their essay during hours of self-guided work. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. For each plagiarized sentence, the student loses one point (for example, 8 → 7). If there are more than three plagiarized sentences in one’s work, the grade for the essay is a zero. The essay should be uploaded before the deadline. If one’s essay is late, it is not accepted or assessed – the grade is a zero. This paper should incorporate at least two additional sources. These sources may include critical perspectives, authorial commentaries, and / or historical assessments.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (4 module)
    0.27 * Essay 1 + 0.29 * Essay 2 (= Written Examination) + 0.24 * Reading Journals + 0.2 * Seminar Attendance
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Cavanagh, D. (2014). The Edinburgh Introduction to Studying English Literature: Vol. Second edition edited by Dermot Cavanagh, Alan Gillis, Michelle Keown, James Loxley and Randall Stev. Edinburgh University Press.
  • Hans Bertens, & Theo D’haen. (2014). American Literature : A History. Routledge.

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Axelrod, S. G., Roman, C., & Travisano, T. J. (2012). The New Anthology of American Poetry : Postmodernisms 1950-Present. Rutgers University Press.
  • John G. Cawelti. (1976). Adventure, Mystery, and Romance : Formula Stories As Art and Popular Culture. University of Chicago Press.
  • Peter Brooker, & Andrew Thacker. (2009). The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines : Volume I: Britain and Ireland 1880-1955. OUP Oxford.
  • Wild, J. (2017). Literature of the 1900s : The Great Edwardian Emporium. EUP.