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Regular version of the site

Stalin and Stalinism in Russian History

2021/2022
Academic Year
ENG
Instruction in English
3
ECTS credits
Delivered at:
School of History
Course type:
Compulsory course
When:
3 year, 1, 2 module

Instructor

Course Syllabus

Abstract

This online course presents the life and deeds of Joseph Stalin, the leader of the Soviet Union from 1924 till 1953. It discusses the reasons for his actions and their results, as well as the causes of his popularity in Russia today. It offers an analysis of the phenomenon of Stalinism and of its significance for Russia and beyond. In the late 1920s – early 1930s Stalin directed the massive and rapid industrialisation of the country and the forced collectivisation of its agriculture. The industrialisation was based on forced labour, and collectivisation on repression, but both helped to create the material base for the Soviet defence industry. In the late 1930s Stalin unleashed mass terror against the Soviet people, in which millions perished. In his view this helped to rid the country of any potential internal enemies on the eve of the coming war. The USSR, together with its allies, won the Second World War, but at the cost of dozens of millions of lives. Stalin was instrumental in creating the post-war order. The system which he created in the 1930s shaped the USSR as it was during his lifetime and for decades after his death. It also influenced the lives of millions of people beyond the Soviet borders. Stalin and his methods remain popular among significant segments of the Russian population to this day. The course is designed for all those who want to know more about the history of Russia, particularly in the 20th century. It will enable those who take it to develop an informed understanding of the Stalin era and of the phenomenon of Stalinism. It can be taken independently or as a distance learning supplement to the off-line courses on Soviet history.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • To acquaint students with the main events and problems of the Stalin era of Soviet history.
  • To acquaint students with the main features of Stalinism as a historical phenomenon.
  • To get students to understand relations between power and society in the Stalin era.
  • To develop in students an understanding of the reasons for the popularity of Stalin and Stalinism in Russia today.
  • To acquaint students with the historiography of the Stalin era and Stalinism in Russian history.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • By the end of the course the students should know the main events and problems of the Stalin era of Soviet history
  • By the end of the course the students should know the main events and problems of the Stalin era of Soviet history,
  • By the end of the course the students should know the main events and problems of the Stalin era of Soviet history,
  • They should know and understand the main features of the historiography of the Stalin era and Stalinism.
  • They should understand relations between power and society in the Stalin era and be able to define and discuss similar patterns in other countries.
  • They should understand the reasons for the popularity of Stalin and Stalinism in Russia today.
  • To develop in students an understanding of the reasons for the popularity of Stalin and Stalinism in Russia today.
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Week 1: Introduction
  • Week 2: Stalin in the Revolution.
  • Week 3: The Leader.
  • Week 4: Stalin’s Revolution from above
  • Week 5: The Dictator
  • Week 6: Stalin’s War
  • Week 7: Stalin’s Victory
  • Week 8: The Last Years of the Dictatorship
  • Week 9: Stalin and Stalinism
  • Week 10: Stalinism after Stalin
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы
  • non-blocking Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы
  • non-blocking Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы
  • non-blocking Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы
  • non-blocking Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы
  • non-blocking Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы
  • non-blocking Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы
  • non-blocking Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы
  • non-blocking Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы
  • non-blocking Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы
  • non-blocking Эссе для взаимного оценивания
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • 2021/2022 1st module
  • 2021/2022 2nd module
    0.1 * Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы + 0.1 * Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы + 0.05 * Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы + 0.05 * Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы + 0.05 * Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы + 0.05 * Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы + 0.1 * Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы + 0.05 * Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы + 0.05 * Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы + 0.1 * Тестирование в формате открытого ответа на вопросы + 0.3 * Эссе для взаимного оценивания
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Fitzpatrick, S. (2007). Revisionism in Soviet History. History & Theory, 46(4), 77–91. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2303.2007.00429.x
  • R. W. Davies, Mark Harrison, Oleg Khlevniuk, & Stephen G. Wheatcroft. (2018). The Industrialisation of Soviet Russia Volume 7: The Soviet Economy and the Approach of War, 1937–1939. Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Stephen Kotkin. (2014). Stalin : Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928. Penguin Books.
  • Stephen Kotkin. (2014). Stalin : Waiting for Hitler, 1929-1941. Penguin Books.
  • Yoram Gorlizki, & Oleg Khlevniuk. (2004). Cold Peace : Stalin and the Soviet Ruling Circle, 1945-1953. Oxford University Press.

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Fitzpatrick, S. (1999). Everyday Stalinism : Ordinary Life in Extraordinary Times: Soviet Russia in the 1930s. New York: Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=169117
  • Fitzpatrick, S., & Geyer, M. (2009). Beyond Totalitarianism : Stalinism and Nazism Compared. New York, N.Y.: Cambridge University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=263477
  • Khlevniuk, O. (2018). Stalin’s War Cabinet: ‘Normalisation’ and Political Dynamics of the Dictatorship. Europe-Asia Studies, 70(7), 1019–1035. https://doi.org/10.1080/09668136.2018.1489045
  • Kotkin, S. (1997). Magnetic Mountain : Stalinism As a Civilization (Vol. [Pbk. ed., 1997]). Berkeley, Calif: University of California Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=21251
  • Stalinism : new directions / ed. by Sheila Fitzpatrick. (2000). London [u.a.]: Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edswao&AN=edswao.080753531
  • Yoram Gorlizki, & Oleg Khlevniuk. (2020). Substate Dictatorship : Networks, Loyalty, and Institutional Change in the Soviet Union. Yale University Press.