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Regular version of the site
Master 2018/2019

Visual Perception and Attention

Area of studies: Psychology
Delivered by: School of Psychology
When: 1 year, 4 module
Mode of studies: offline
Master’s programme: Cognitive Sciences and Technologies: From Neuron to Cognition
Language: English
ECTS credits: 4

Course Syllabus

Abstract

Visual perception is an inference of a scene out there based on a sensory input from eyes. Visual attention is a process concentrating a computational force of the brain on a specific aspect of the perceived scene or of the sensory input. The processes of perception and attention interact with one another and the interaction is even indispensable for them. This course will review studies of them and of interactions between them. Theories behind perception and attention will be particularly emphasized. The first half of the course mostly covers perception: how the scene is represented in the brain, how the representation is computed in the brain, and how the perceptual process affects and is affected by attention. The second half of the course more emphasizes attention itself: types of attention, how attention affects cognitive performance, how it makes us see what we see, how it is linked to memory and consciousness, and why it is limited.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • learning multidisciplinary views to problems in Psychology
  • learning theoretical and analytical thinking of problems in psychology via studying theories in vision science
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Learn the ability to control visual stimuli in behavioral and neuro-physiological experiments
  • Know the basics and theories about the forward and inverse relations between the distal stimuli and their perception
  • Know the basics about multi-disciplinary aspects of vision science
  • Learn the ability to control visual stimuli in experiments
  • Knows theories of visual perception and its current questions
  • Knows the basics about attention and consciousness
  • Knows the basics about visual representations beyond the focus of attention
  • Knows the basics of feature-based and object-based attention
  • Knows the basics about the deployment of attention over space and time
  • Knows the basics of varieties of attention and early attentional theories
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Attention and consciousness
  • Visual representations beyond the focus of attention
  • Feature-based and object-based attention
  • Formalizing problems on vision
    Fechner's causal chain of events; Well-posed and Ill-posed problems;
  • Color perception
    Physics of light; Physiological aspects of color perception; Color constancy
  • 2D and 3D perception
    Gestalt psychology; Depth cues; A priori constraints
  • Psychophysics and Neuroscience
    M-scaling, Log-polar coordinate system in V1, Iso-luminance
  • Varieties of attention and early attentional theories
  • The deployment of attention over space and time
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Home assignments (Perception)
    2 Visual perception home assignments; Its weight in grading is 0.21.
  • non-blocking Take home exam (Perception)
    1 take home exam around the end of the 4th module; Its weight in grading is 0.28.
  • non-blocking Home assignment (Attention)
    1 Visual attention home assignment; Its weight in grading is 0.21.
  • non-blocking Oral presentation
    1 oral presentation; Its weight in grading is 0.30. The 1st-retake of a home assignment is evaluated in the same way as the original assignment. The 2nd-retake of the assignment comes with 20% of penalty on its score. Namely, its score is first computed in the same way as the original assignment and then the computed score is multiplied by 0.8.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (4 module)
    0.21 * Home assignment (Attention) + 0.21 * Home assignments (Perception) + 0.3 * Oral presentation + 0.28 * Take home exam (Perception)
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Busemeyer, J. R. (2015). The Oxford Handbook of Computational and Mathematical Psychology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=958385
  • Foster, D. H. (2011). Color constancy. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.9F267FAC
  • Lu, Z.-L., & Dosher, B. (2014). Visual Psychophysics : From Laboratory to Theory. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=649168

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Bender, M. (2011). 3D Shape. Its Unique Place in Visual Perception. * Zygmunt Pizlo. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.C99AC9B0
  • Howard, I. P., & Rogers, B. J. (2012). Perceiving in Depth. New York: Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=414436
  • Howard, I. P., & Rogers, B. J. (2012). Perceiving in Depth. New York: Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=414437
  • Howard, I. P., & Rogers, B. J. (2012). Perceiving in Depth. New York: Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=414438