• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site
2018/2019

Global Political Economy

Language: English

Course Syllabus

Abstract

he key issue around which the course develops its subject matter is international cooperation in various policy areas and the role of international institutions in facilitating global governance of global is- sues such as trade, finance, development, climate change, and other social and macroeconomic policies. The course is a fine balance between traditional International Relations courses that focus on security and foreign policies and courses that are often titled Politics of International Economic Relations that focus on trade and monetary policies. In that, it discusses theories, research methods, globalization and its impact on national public policy substance and processes, evolving relations between states and markets, and among states.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • This course aims to introduce students at an advanced level with the contemporary issues in global political economy, theoretical frameworks and research approaches to analyze the issues of global political economy.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • As a result of studying this module the student should be able to demonstrate theoretical grasp over international public policy substance and processes what are often termed global governance
  • As a result of studying this module the student should acquire the skills for analyzing the issue of international cooperation on an area of global political economy
  • As a result of studying this module the student should know theoretical foundations of understanding global political economy, contemporary is- sues of global political economy, international cooperation, and institutions
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Introduction to Global Political Economy
  • Power, States, and Markets
  • Realism and Liberalism
  • Marxism and Constructivism
  • Research Issues in GPE
  • Globalisation, Welfare State, and Public Policy
  • International Trade and WTO
  • Monetary Policy, Finance, and IMF
  • Development, World Bank, UN
  • Energy, Climate Change, and IPCC
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Participation
  • non-blocking Presentation
  • non-blocking Essay
  • non-blocking Final paper
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (4 module)
    0.3 * Essay + 0.3 * Final paper + 0.2 * Participation + 0.2 * Presentation
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Burchill, S., Linklater, A., & Devetak, R. (2013). Theories of International Relations (Vol. 5th ed). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1526050
  • Gilpin, R. (DE-576)161117015. (2001). Global political economy : understanding the international economic order / Robert Gilpin. Princeton, NJ [u.a.]: Princeton Univ. Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edswao&AN=edswao.089772180
  • Mearsheimer, J. J. (1995). A realist reply. International Security, 20(1), 82. https://doi.org/10.2307/2539218
  • Michael Howlett, & M. Ramesh. (2006). Preface: The Evolution of De/Reregulation. Chapters. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsrep&AN=edsrep.h.elg.eechap.4210.1

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Haas, P. M. (1992). Introduction: epistemic communities and international policy coordination. International Organization, 46(1), 1. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0020818300001442
  • John Ravenhill. (2014). Global value chains and development. Review of International Political Economy, (1), 264. https://doi.org/10.1080/09692290.2013.858366
  • Taliaferro, J. W., Ripsman, N. M., & Lobell, S. E. (2009). Neoclassical Realism, the State, and Foreign Policy. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=269173