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Regular version of the site
Bachelor 2018/2019

Philosophy

Category 'Best Course for Broadening Horizons and Diversity of Knowledge and Skills'
Area of studies: Business Informatics
When: 1 year, 1, 2 module
Mode of studies: Full time
Language: English
ECTS credits: 4

Course Syllabus

Abstract

This course is designed to introduce students to key philosophical ideas and debates. In module one, this aim will be achieved via a close reading of two foundational texts in philosophy: Plato’s Apology and Plato’s Republic. Themes to be discussed include truth, knowledge, reality, justice, statecraft, science, morality, sexuality, and art. In module two, several of these themes will be discussed in greater detail, with particular attention dedicated to knowledge and science as well as the practical application of these ideas to information technology.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • The student is required to read, analyze, and reflect upon the ideas presented in the texts studied, and they should leave the course with an open mind: that is, they should be open to seeing and thinking about the world in ways they did not before.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Students should become familiar with some of the main areas of research in contemporary philosophy
  • The student is required to read, analyze, and reflect upon the ideas presented in the texts studied, and they should leave the course with an open mind: that is, they should be open to seeing and thinking about the world in ways they did not before.
  • Students should become familiar with theories of meaning, verification, falsifiability, scientific revolutions.
  • Students should become able to analyse and discuss philosophical texts.
  • Students should become familliar with issues in applied philosophy (philosophy of technology)
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • General introduction to Philosophy
    Online introduction to contemporary philosophy: Epistemology, Philosophy of science, Philosophy of Mind, Political Philosophy, Moral Philosophy, Metaphysics
  • Plato's Republic
    Reading Plato’s Republic. Themes to be discussed include truth, knowledge, reality, justice, statecraft, science, morality, sexuality, and art.
  • The problem of knowledge. Applied philosophy
    Introduction to problems and foundational approaches to knowledge and science: meaning, verification, falsifiability, scientific revolutions. Issues in applied philosophy: information and communication technologies, privacy.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Written test on the topics of the first module
  • non-blocking Online activities (see "Electronic educational resources"). Certificate of accomplishment required
  • non-blocking Written test on the contents of the second module (terminology, theories, text analysis)
  • non-blocking Oral exam on text analysis and discussion
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (2 module)
    0.05 * Online activities (see "Electronic educational resources"). Certificate of accomplishment required + 0.15 * Oral exam on text analysis and discussion + 0.35 * Written test on the contents of the second module (terminology, theories, text analysis) + 0.45 * Written test on the topics of the first module
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Bird, A. (2012). The Structure of Scientific Revolutions and its Significance: An Essay Review of the Fiftieth Anniversary Edition. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.7877F69A
  • Floridi, L. (2014). The Fourth Revolution : How the Infosphere Is Reshaping Human Reality (Vol. First edition). New York, New York: OUP Oxford. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=772840
  • Plato, Reeve, C. D. C., & Grube, G. M. A. (1992). Republic. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company, Inc. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=408154
  • Popper, K. R. (2002). Conjectures and Refutations : The Growth of Scientific Knowledge. London: Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=771514
  • Substance and function, and Einstein’s theory of relativity. (1923). Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.56C230A6

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Preston, J. (2008). Kuhn’s ’The Structure of Scientific Revolutions’ : A Reader’s Guide. London: Continuum. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=837746