• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site
Bachelor 2019/2020

Art Practice

Type: Elective course (Design)
Area of studies: Design
When: 1 year, 1-4 module
Mode of studies: offline
Language: English
ECTS credits: 12

Course Syllabus

Abstract

The “Art practice” course aims to shape basic skills in the sphere of visual arts, e.g. drawing, painting and combination techniques; basics of composition and application of colors. Students will develop creative thinking, dive in to artistic experiments and start to search for new forms of artistic expression. The discipline foresees wide range of creative paths from simple drawings, to academic drawings and installations.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • pon completion of the course students must learn: • how to implement project tasks through cooperative methods of work; • apply principles of social responsibility in practice; • use various data search techniques.
  • Upon completion of the course students must know how to: • educate themselves, acquire new knowledge and skills not only in their professional area but in other spheres as well; • reproduce the accumulated experience; • use creative methods and demonstrate exceptional skills of solving creative tasks; • integrate their professional activities in national and international social and cultural processes;
  • Upon completion of the course students must possess: • self-study skills; • abilities to search for and analyze information from various sources; • objective setting and problem solving talents; • ability to communicate in professional circles and to influence creative potential of the whole industry.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Students will study different drawing techniques (real life drawing, right side of the brain drawing, etc.) and develop their own style. The outcome of the first module will be a sketchbook, for which the student will have to select the theme and make drawings in one of his/her own drawing styles. The main point is to formulate clear concept which will unite all drawings in the sketchbook
  • The for joint project will be organized in groups of three students as it is done on advertising agencies. This will enable students to play different roles in the theme, allocate responsibility and eventually implement a joint art project of a bigger scale
  • Students will study black and white graphic art, ink drawings, eastern techniques, in particular Chinese writing tradition. On later stages students will search for visual language to illustrate an abstract from a book using basic principles of typical illustration.
  • At this stage the students will learn several new techniques (oil paint, acrylic paint, installation, etc.), which can be further used to implement their idea of an art project. The themes for the art projects are selected by students themselves and implementation can be done in any applicable style from classic to modern art.
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Theme 1. Sketching
    Students will study different drawing techniques (real life drawing, right side of the brain drawing, etc.) and develop their own style. The outcome of the first module will be a sketchbook, for which the student will have to select the theme and make drawings in one of his/her own drawing styles. The main point is to formulate clear concept which will unite all drawings in the sketchbook. As part of self-study students shall perform tasks aimed at improving skills and techniques acquired during contact hours. Forms and methods of study include: practical assignments, case studies, discussions, workshops with invited experts in the field.
  • Theme 2. Joint project
    The for joint project will be organized in groups of three students as it is done on advertising agencies. This will enable students to play different roles in the theme, allocate responsibility and eventually implement a joint art project of a bigger scale. As part of self-study students shall perform tasks aimed at improving skills and techniques acquired during contact hours. Forms and methods of study include: practical assignments, case studies, discussions, workshops with invited experts in the field.
  • Theme 3. Illustrations
    Students will study black and white graphic art, ink drawings, eastern techniques, in particular Chinese writing tradition. On later stages students will search for visual language to illustrate an abstract from a book using basic principles of typical illustration. As part of self-study students shall perform tasks aimed at improving skills and techniques acquired during contact hours. Forms and methods of study include: practical assignments, case studies, discussions, workshops with invited experts in the field.
  • Theme 4. Art project
    At this stage the students will learn several new techniques (oil paint, acrylic paint, installation, etc.), which can be further used to implement their idea of an art project. The themes for the art projects are selected by students themselves and implementation can be done in any applicable style from classic to modern art. As part of self-study students shall perform tasks aimed at improving skills and techniques acquired during contact hours. Forms and methods of study include: practical assignments, case studies, discussions, workshops with invited experts in the field.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking attendance
  • non-blocking project
    For exams without proctoring: The exam in Art and Design School is carried out orally – defence of the project. The exam is conducted on several platforms, depending on the needs of the teacher and students. Possible platforms for the exam in design courses: ZOOM Skype MS Teams Discord It is necessary to connect to the exam 15 minutes before the start. The ability to test the platform is at the discretion of students and teachers and it is not obligatory for the exam. A student’s computer and / or other gadget must satisfy the following requirement - a working microphone. The possibility of demonstrating a screen and a working camera are at the discretion of the student and teacher. The lack of a working camera and the inability to demonstrate the screen is not an obstacle to passing the exam. A teacher participating in the exam or a specialist in the Technical Office can assist the student with demonstrating his screen in consultation with the student and with a presentation on the Student Portfolio website. To participate in the exam, the student is required to upload the project to the Student Portfolio website and organize their presence in the exam to receive feedback on their project. It is highly recommended that when connecting to the view, it is correct to indicate your last name and first name, as well as the group number. During the exam, students are forbidden to interrupt the defender and participate in commenting on not their project. During the exam, students are allowed to independently present their project, respond to comments on their project, help other students show a screen with the project, but only if the project is loaded into the Student Portfolio system. A short-term communication disruption during the exam is considered a communication disruption of less than a minute. Long-term communication disruption during the exam is considered a violation of a minute or more. In case of a long-term communication disruption, the student cannot continue to participate in the exam. The retake procedure is similar to the procedure for defence a project in an exam.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (1 module)
    100% of the final grade = 25% (grade for the first midterm test) + 25% (grade for the second midterm test) + 25% (grade for homework) + 25% (grade for attendance)
  • Interim assessment (2 module)
    100% of the final grade = 25% (grade for the first midterm test) + 25% (grade for the second midterm test) + 25% (grade for homework) + 25% (grade for attendance)
  • Interim assessment (3 module)
    100% of the final grade = 25% (grade for the first midterm test) + 25% (grade for the second midterm test) + 25% (grade for homework) + 25% (grade for attendance)
  • Interim assessment (4 module)
    100% of the final grade = 25% (grade for the first midterm test) + 25% (grade for the second midterm test) + 25% (grade for homework) + 25% (grade for attendance) 0.250 attendance 0.250 project
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Benhamou, F., & Ginsburgh, V. (2006). Copies of Artworks: The Case of Paintings and Prints. Handbook of the Economics of Art and Culture, 253. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsrep&AN=edsrep.h.eee.artchp.1.08
  • Bushell, S. W. (2012). Chinese Art. New York: Parkstone International. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=455924
  • Hay, J. (2004). Ten Thousand Things: Module and Mass Production in Chinese Art (Book). Art Bulletin, 86(2), 381. https://doi.org/10.2307/3177424
  • Ingold, T. (2010). Ways of mind-walking: reading, writing, painting. Visual Studies, 25(1), 15–23. https://doi.org/10.1080/14725861003606712
  • Richardson, T., Hendrix, H., & Stelling, L. (2012). The Turn of the Soul : Representations of Religious Conversion in Early Modern Art and Literature. Leiden: Brill. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=429973

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Art market and connoisseurship: a closer look at paintings by Rembrandt, Rubens and their contemporaries. (2008). Amsterdam University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsnar&AN=edsnar.oai.dare.uva.nl.publications.cbf0cdb6.dc95.42d6.b4cb.12a2c245631c
  • Callen, A. (2015). The Work of Art : Plein Air Painting and Artistic Identity in Nineteenth-Century France. London: Reaktion Books. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1194802
  • Chesneau, E. (2013). English Painting. New York: Parkstone International. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=630272
  • Orfila, J. (2007). Paul Cézanne and the making of modern art history. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsndl&AN=edsndl.oai.union.ndltd.org.OCLC.oai.xtcat.oclc.org.OCLCNo.181590044
  • Pirazzoli-t’Serstevens Michèle. (2001). Lothar Ledderose, Ten Thousand Things, Module and Mass Production in Chinese Art (The A.W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, 1998, The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Bollingen Series XXXV: 46). Arts Asiatiques, (1), 171. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsper&AN=edsper.arasi.0004.3958.2001.num.56.1.1477.t1.0171.0000.5
  • Reeves, B. T. (2007). The Role of the Ekphrasis in Plot Development: The Painting of Europa and the Bull in Achilles Tatius’ Leucippe and Clitophon. Mnemosyne, 60(1), 87–101. https://doi.org/10.1163/156852507X165856
  • Törmä, M. (2013). Enchanted by Lohans : Osvald Sireþn’s Journey Into Chinese Art. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=638991