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Regular version of the site
Bachelor 2019/2020

Chinese Politics Part 1 – China and Political Science

Type: Elective course (Asian and African Studies)
Area of studies: Asian and African Studies
When: 3 year, 1 module
Mode of studies: Blended
Instructors: Maria Efimenko
Language: English
ECTS credits: 4

Course Syllabus

Abstract

Chinese Politics Part 1 – China and Political Science is an online course available on platform Coursera https://www.coursera.org/learn/chinesepolitics1. This course offers a conceptual framework for understanding China that highlights the intersection of politics and economics. It shows that rather than develop into a full blown market economy, state and party officials at all levels of the political system maintain significant influence in economic development. Such a “political” economy has had both positive and negative outcomes, which we will assess in detail. We also look at the origins, views, backgrounds and relations among leaders, and how those leaders make decisions about public policy and try to get those decisions implemented down through the system. China has few formal institutions through which citizens can participate in politics, but we will study the strategies Chinese people use to try to influence their leaders’ decisions. Finally, we assess China’s future and whether rapid economic development and the emergence of a vibrant middle class will push China towards greater democracy or whether the single party system is likely to survive into the future. The course is a quite useful background for Chinese Politics Part 2 – China and the World.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • Course gives a basic understanding on China and Political Science
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Кузкщвгсус ьodels of the Chinese Political System and the Structure of the Chinese Party/State
  • Has knowledge of Elite Politics in China
  • Gains knowledge pf Policy Process in China
  • Analyses the Societal Engagement in Politics in China
  • Perceives China’s Domestic and International Political Economy
  • Perceives China’s Future: Democratization or “Flexible Authoritarianism”
  • Is able to discuss China and Political Science
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Module 1. Models of the Chinese Political System and the Structure of the Chinese Party/State
    1.1: Categorizing the System through Models 1.2: Bureaucratic Model and Chinese Politics 1.3: The Structure of the Political System 1.4: Key Party Structures 1.5: Government and the Party 1.6: China’s Legislature 1.7: The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and China’s Military 1.8: CCP Controls the Judiciary
  • Module 2. Elite Politics in China
    2.1: Elite Politics affects Economics and Business 2.2: Leadership Values, Structures of Conflict and Political Stability 2.3: Key Strategies for Elite Success and Elite Mobility in China 2.4: Selection of Leaders: What do we know? 2.5: Retired Leaders and the Succession Process 2.6: New Leaders Bring Policy Changes 2.7: Characteristics of Chinese Middle-level Leadership 2.8: Generations among Chinese Elites 2.9: International Experience of Top Chinese Leaders
  • Module 3: Policy Process in China
    3.1: Policy Process in Chinese Politics 3.2: The Politics of Policy Making in China 3.3: Selecting Policy Alternatives 3.4: Making the Decision 3.5: Social Interests and Policy Making 3.6: Policy Implementation through Campaigns 3.7: Local Response, Unintended Consequences and Policy Adjustment 3.8: Policy Failures and Successes
  • Module 4: Understanding Societal Engagement in Politics in China
    4.1: Political Culture in China 4.2: Political Culture as Empirically Measurable Variable 4.3: Political Culture in Rural China 4.4: Political Participation 4.5: Details on the Modes of Participation 4.6: Group Activity and Group Politics 4.7: Collective Action and Protest 4.8: Key Social Groups who Participate in Politics 4.9: Concluding the Modes of Participation
  • Module 5: China’s Domestic and International Political Economy
    .1: Six Components of China's Political Economy 5.2: China’s Political Economy on the Eve of Reform 5.3: Impact of Reforms on China’s Political Economy 5.4: The Impact of Reform on Rural Income 5.5: China’s Township and Village Enterprises (TVEs), 1984-1994 5.6: Role of the Public Sector in China's Political Economy 5.7: Central-Local Financial Relations 5.8: China as a “Trading State” 5.9: Dilemmas of a “Trading State” 5.10: Chinese Firms “Going Out”
  • Module 6: China’s Future: Democratization or “Flexible Authoritarianism”
    6.1: China’s Future 6.2: Scenario 1: Political Development and Democratic Transition 6.3: Scenario 1: Further Forces for Political Development and Democratic Transition 6.4: Lessons from Scenarios of Democratic Transition 6.5: Scenario 2: Continued Market Leninism 6.6: Constraints on Society and Ideology 6.7: Xi Jinping’s Intense Attack on Corruption 6.8: Jiang Zemin’s “Three Representatives” and the Role of the Middle Class 6.9: Scenario 3: Collapse of the CCP 6.10: Sources of Political Instability 6.11: Inequality, Corruption and CCP Rule 6.12: Conclusion
  • Module 7: Debate
    Classroom discussion
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Debate
    Debates missed by a student for a good reason (illness, scientific or academic trip, participation in a conference, etc., documented to the training office), if agreed with the teacher, may not be taken into account and the weight will be redistributed to all elements of the online course control. The retake of the exam is possible in accordance with the “Regulation on the organization of intermediate certification and ongoing monitoring of student performance at the Higher School of Economics”. Student has to pass the online course once again
  • non-blocking Test 1
  • non-blocking Test 2
  • non-blocking Test 3
  • non-blocking Test 4
  • non-blocking Test 5
  • non-blocking Test 6
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (1 module)
    0.1 * Debate + 0.15 * Test 1 + 0.15 * Test 2 + 0.15 * Test 3 + 0.15 * Test 4 + 0.15 * Test 5 + 0.15 * Test 6
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Agamben, G. (2000). Means Without End : Notes on Politics. Minneapolis: Univ Of Minnesota Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=172715
  • Mankiw, N. G. (DE-588)120973626, (DE-576)164048383. (2000). Macroeconomics / N. Gregory Mankiw. New York, NY: Worth. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edswao&AN=edswao.07890529X

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Li, C. (2016). Chinese Politics in the Xi Jinping Era : Reassessing Collective Leadership. Washington: Brookings Institution Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1001080
  • Mankiw, N. G. (1990). A Quick Refresher Course in Macroeconomics. Journal of Economic Literature, (4), 1645. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsrep&AN=edsrep.a.aea.jeclit.v28y1990i4p1645.60