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Regular version of the site
Master 2019/2020

Business Model Innovation

Area of studies: Management
When: 1 year, 4 module
Mode of studies: Full time
Instructors: Boris Ryabov
Master’s programme: Governance of Science, Technology and Innovation
Language: English
ECTS credits: 3

Course Syllabus

Abstract

Business Model Innovation is a topic rarely taught at universities. Companies are often confronted with the challenge to adjust their business model to changing environments but lack a pro-found understanding what they should change and to which extend. The course thus provides insights to students how companies can change their business model, identify opportunities for business model innovation and how such innovation and changes should be implemented in the organization. The course is designed for master students and represents an upper level course. It discusses business model innovation as one of the most important forms of innovation and stresses the need for organizations to adjust to changing environments and to adapt their business models. The course length is 114 academic hours in total of which 32 hours are class room hours and 82 are devoted to self study.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • main features of business innovation models
  • key factors for successfully designing and implementing business model innovation
  • the management of different local business models under the umbrella of multinational companies
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Classify change resulting from business model innovation
  • Describe or evaluate risk inherent in business model implementing change
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • The meaning of business model innovation
    Business models and Business model innovation (BMI) are relatively new notions for economists and management practitioners and they are still hotly debated. Nevertheless, the significance of BMI in modern corporate strategy and competition is broadly accepted. Putting BMI in the adequate conceptual context, understanding key factors driving its growing importance in the current business environment becomes very timely task from both theoretical and practical perspectives
  • Main areas of change in business model innovation
    There could be a huge number of changes in the course of BMI process but it would be important to define the key directions of these changes that have already proved to be a success in the global and national context. Another significant issue relates to the scale of these changes and their potential influence on the specific industry structure and market organization. One of the key recent trends covers disruptive business model innovation leading to major industry transformations and establishment of new standard industry business modules.
  • The implementation challenges of BMI in large corporations: The role of culture for innovation
    BMI poses challenges for established companies, once they are dealing with changing market conditions, qualitatively changing the environment for the companies. This unpacks changes in routines, behavioral patterns and most importantly corporate culture. Organizationally, integration and/or coexistence are most widely deployed strategies. BMI in new venture creation has a different angle of seeding the right culture from the onset of the company. The balance between growing a substantially rigid structure and keeping flexibility is a tricky one. BMI goes beyond the purely commercial focus, as the concept is suitable for social business and non-for-profit as well, including very loose networks.
  • Business models for markets – multinationals with diverging local business models
    Market conditions differ horizontally between the national markets and/or segments, as well as vertically between the value chain segments and partners. Balancing between centralized and custom policies and guidance is a dynamic process, much dependent on industry and market specifics but as well processes layout and communication culture. The concept of corporation is a model as well and needs to be evaluated within the framework of BMI.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Final control
  • non-blocking Seminar
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (4 module)
    0.7 * Final control + 0.3 * Seminar
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Afuah, A. (2018). Business Model Innovation : Concepts, Analysis, and Cases. New York, NY: Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1907925
  • Kaplan, S. (2012). The Business Model Innovation Factory : How to Stay Relevant When The World Is Changing. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=443110
  • Magretta, J. (2002). Why Business Models Matter. Harvard Business Review, 80(5), 86–92. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=bsu&AN=6623782
  • Muehlhausen, J. (2013). Business Models For Dummies. Hoboken, N.J.: For Dummies. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=588015
  • Osterwalder, A., Clark, T., & Pigneur, Y. (2010). Business Model Generation : A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=335366
  • Shafer, S. M., Smith, H. J., & Linder, J. C. (2005). The power of business models. Business Horizons, (3), 199. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsrep&AN=edsrep.a.eee.bushor.v48y2005i3p199.207

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Creating and capturing sustainable value through business model and service innovation. (2018). Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.B1E3C646