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Regular version of the site
Bachelor 2019/2020

Academic Writing. Advanced English

Type: Elective course (HSE/NES Programme in Economics)
Area of studies: Economics
Delivered by: HSE/NES Undergraduate Programmes Curriculum Support
When: 1 year, 1, 2 module
Mode of studies: Full time
Language: English
ECTS credits: 6

Course Syllabus

Abstract

On television, in the newspaper, and on the internet, arguments are all around us. We make arguments when we speak to our instructors, our parents, our friends. We encounter them when we read signs on the highway or consult our favorite popular culture blog. Arguments—speech acts designed to persuade—are at the core of human communication, though many of us never think about understanding how to interpret and produce them as essential skills for developing literacy and fluency. Advanced College Writing is designed for students at an advanced level of English language study who wish to have a firmer grounding in writing before proceeding to content courses where more highly developed writing skills are required. Though continuing to build English language fluency is a goal for this course, at its heart, this is a course in argumentation grounded in both classical and modern rhetorical theory.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • The aim of the course is to help you develop the skills necessary to understand, break down, and critique someone else’s argument while also helping you develop a process for constructing and presenting your own ideas in a persuasive form.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Upon completion of this course, students should have progressed in their ability to analyze the arguments of others with reference to basic rhetorical principles, such as logos, ethos, and pathos, argument types, and rhetorical fallacies.• Deliver an argument-driven presentation in English
  • Formulate an interesting research question Locate, evaluate, and cite sources in the scholarly, journalistic, and popular domains
  • Write in common academic genres such as the proposal and the literature review Write well-organized, argument-driven papers that demonstrate awareness of exigency and audience and deploy appropriate modes of persuasion Identify and correct common grammar and vocabulary mistakes in English Revise in response to feedback from peer readers as well as the instructor Participate in oral discussion and debate in English, though, it should be stressed, this is not predominantly a speaking course
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Finding and Understanding Arguments
    Introduction; What is an Argument? Argument and Communication Finding and Evaluating Sources Introductions and Conclusions
  • Analyzing Arguments
    Breaking Down an Argument Rhetorical Analysis: Arguments and Audience Short Analysis I Analyzing a Creative Work Common Grammatical Errors and How to Fix Them Punctuation Rules in English
  • Making Arguments
    Debate Wrap-Up Discussion Final Presentations
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Journal Entries
  • non-blocking Peer Review Participation
  • non-blocking Short Assignments (research summaries and short analysis papers)
  • non-blocking Major Essay 1.1
    Major Essay 1 is given an “advisory” grade that does not actually count toward the final grade. It just tells you what you would have gotten so that you are well-informed going into the revision. Major Essays 2.1 and 3.1 count toward the final grade.
  • blocking Major Essay 1.2
    All assignments are due at 20:00 on the date listed on the schedule. Every student is allowed one 48-hour extension without penalty. This extension must be requested by email (as conversations in the chaos before and after class are easily forgotten) prior to the deadline. Only the following assignments are eligible for this extension: Research Summary 1 Research Summary 2 Research Summary 3 Short Analysis 1 Short Analysis 2 Major Essay 1.2 Major Essay 2.2 Major Essay 3.2 Ineligible assignments will receive a zero (with no feedback) if not submitted by the time the instructor downloads papers from my.nes.ru at 20:00.
  • non-blocking Major Essay 2.1
  • blocking Major Essay 2.2
  • non-blocking Major Essay 3.1
  • blocking Major Essay 3.2 –
  • non-blocking Final Presentation
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (2 module)
    0.05 * Final Presentation + 0.05 * Journal Entries + 0.15 * Major Essay 1.2 + 0.1 * Major Essay 2.1 + 0.15 * Major Essay 2.2 + 0.1 * Major Essay 3.1 + 0.15 * Major Essay 3.2 – + 0.05 * Peer Review Participation + 0.2 * Short Assignments (research summaries and short analysis papers)
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Bailey, S. (2017). Academic Writing : A Handbook for International Students (Vol. Fifth edition). London: Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1650435
  • Mathilde Janier, & Patrick Saint-Dizier. (2019). Argument Mining : Linguistic Foundations. [N.p.]: Wiley-ISTE. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=2274843

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Richard Feldman. (2013). Reason and Argument: Pearson New International Edition. Harlow, United Kingdom: Pearson. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1418757
  • Witzlack-Makarevich, A., & Bickel, B. (2019). Argument Selectors : A New Perspective on Grammatical Relations. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=2029881