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Regular version of the site
Bachelor 2019/2020

Special Topics of Sociology

Type: Elective course (Sociology and Social Informatics)
Area of studies: Sociology
When: 4 year, 1 module
Mode of studies: Full time
Language: English
ECTS credits: 6

Course Syllabus

Abstract

This course develops students’ understanding of the diversity of social organization by taking the global perspective on social processes that are often learned within the national or European context. The course materials provide an outlook of societies across the world, making a focus on the topics of family, gender and social transformations. All classes are reading-based seminars where participants learn and report the facts and arguments presented in the literature and then develop them further, to fit into their own experience and obtaining discussion-based conclusions. Key readings are provided by leading sociologists from different parts of the globe.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • to develop a cross-regional perspective of the variety of social processes going on across the world, including family, religion, politics, culture, and paths to modernity.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • to raise the awareness of students about the cultural diversity of modernization across the world
  • to learn about specific forms and shapes of family, gender and social transformations
  • be able to discuss the implications of the variety of paths to modernity for building social knowledge and data analysis when dealing with cross-national data
  • be able to reason about social processes in a wider, cross-national perspective
  • be aware of some of the variety of social transformations in family life, gender, and social changes in recent times
  • be more prepared to work in the international social research context
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Patriarchy: its exits and closures.
    Modernities and family systems: patriarchy around 1900. Three moments of socio-gender change. The patriarchal burden of the twenty-first century.
  • Marriage and mutations of the socio-sexual order.
    Sex and marriage in 1900. Marital trends of the twentieth century. The return of cohabitation and the sexual revolution.
  • Couples, babies and states.
    Fertility decline and political natalism. The politics and sociology of birth control.
  • Social change in the age of globalization.
    Construction and deconstruction of the ‘Others’. Radical changes in societies.
  • Cultural diversities in global context.
    Cultural diversity and globalization in East Asia. Baseline equality.
  • Migration: Equality and globalization.
    Dimensions and patterns of inequality in the world. New trends in social stratification.
  • Globalization and national identity.
    Nation building and ethnicity. New cooperative mechanisms under globalization. Globalization and national identity in contemporary society.
  • Europe and Asias: In the global political economy and in the world as a cultural system.
    The world as a cultural system. Cornerstones and patterning of the world cultural system. Civilizations, modernities and history. Positions of “Europe” and “Asias” in the current political economy.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Engagement in seminar
    The rest of the grade is the student’s engagement into discussion: one point is earned with any substantive contribution such as giving facts and figures in support of the argument, and one additional point (two in total) can be earned for summing up or developing the discussion. The student can earn up to two points per seminar for engagement; all the earned points are then summed up. The maximum sum total for engagement is limited by ten.
  • non-blocking Test 1-2
    Each seminar begins with a reading-based test preceding the discussion. There are six tests, one at each pair of seminars, starting from the 3rd seminar. Questions in the tests can be either open- or close-ended. Each test can earn up to 10 points. The resulting grade for the tests is the weighted sum of the higher grade in each pair of tests.
  • non-blocking Test 3-4
    Each seminar begins with a reading-based test preceding the discussion. There are six tests, one at each pair of seminars, starting from the 3rd seminar. Questions in the tests can be either open- or close-ended. Each test can earn up to 10 points. The resulting grade for the tests is the weighted sum of the higher grade in each pair of tests.
  • non-blocking Test 5-6
    Each seminar begins with a reading-based test preceding the discussion. There are six tests, one at each pair of seminars, starting from the 3rd seminar. Questions in the tests can be either open- or close-ended. Each test can earn up to 10 points. The resulting grade for the tests is the weighted sum of the higher grade in each pair of tests.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (1 module)
    0.25 * Engagement in seminar + 0.25 * Test 1-2 + 0.25 * Test 3-4 + 0.25 * Test 5-6
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Khondker, H. H., & Therborn, G. (2006). Asia and Europe in Globalization : Continents, Regions and Nations. Leiden: Brill. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=232285
  • Li, P., Sasaki, M. S., & Jing, T. (2006). Social Change in the Age of Globalization. Leiden: Brill. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=232499
  • Therborn, G. (2004). Between Sex and Power : Family in the World 1900-2000. London: Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=114938

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Go, J. (2013). Decentering Social Theory (Vol. First edition). Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=631028