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Regular version of the site
Bachelor 2019/2020

The Technologies of Symbolic Policy

Type: Compulsory course (Political Science and World Politics)
Area of studies: Political Science
When: 4 year, 3 module
Mode of studies: offline
Language: English
ECTS credits: 5

Course Syllabus

Abstract

This discipline refers to the professional cycle, the basic part of the profile. The main provisions of the discipline can be used in the preparation of term papers and BA diplomas. As a result of mastering the course, students will get the knowledge about the field of symbolic politics; learn to use the concepts that could be used for a study of this field: symbol, ritual, idea, discourse, frame, narrative, myth, propaganda, manipulation, etc.; explore the methodological problems involved in the study of ideational political phenomena; master the skills for a case-focused comparative analysis; get the skills necessary to analyze the phenomena related to the field of symbolic politics, such as propaganda and other forms of political manipulation, discursive identity construction, memory politics, soft power, securitization etc.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • give knowledge about the field of symbolic politics, as the set of public activities aimed at production and promotion/intrusion of certain modes of interpretation of social reality and the struggle for their domination,
  • form the inderstanding of the core concepts that could be used for a study of symbolic politics: symbol, ritual, idea, discourse, frame, narrative, myth, propaganda, manipulation, etc.
  • promote knowledge and skills necessary for implementation of case-focused comparative analysis, study of ideational political phenomena and other phenomena related to the field of symbolic politics
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Understands the essence of narrow and broad perspectives of symbolic politics as a research field
  • Able to apply the methods, frameworks and tools for conducting the analysis of symbolic politics phenomena
  • Understands the essence of the methods, frameworks and tools for conducting the analysis of symbolic politics phenomena
  • Able to use specific tools and instruments for the analysis of the phenomena of symbolic politics in different aspects of social life
  • Understands the core concepts of symbolic politics
  • Understands the role and essence of politics of identity in symbolic politics practices
  • Understands the tools and instruments for the analysis of politics of identity practices
  • Able to use specific tools and instruments for analysis of politics of identity practices
  • Understands the role and essence of political uses of the past in symbolic politics practices
  • Understands the tools and instruments for the analysis of political uses of the past
  • Understands the role and essence of politics of memory in symbolic politics practices
  • Understands the tools and instruments for the analysis of politics of memory
  • Able to use specific tools and instruments for analysis of politics of memory
  • Able to use specific tools and instruments for analysis of politics of memory on the material of Russian case
  • Understands the role and essence of public holidays in symbolic politics practices
  • Understands the usage of specific tools and instruments for analysis of public holidays as tools of the state symbolic policy
  • Understands the role and essence of social protest as symbolic action
  • Understands the tools and instruments for analysis of social protes as symbolic action
  • Understands the role and influence of state symbolic politics on international relationships
  • Understands the tools and instruments for analysis of the role and influence of state symbolic politics on international relationships
  • Understands the the variability of the use of technologies of symbolic politics in different aspects of social life
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Symbolic Politics as a Research Field
  • Symbolic Politics: Instruments of Analysis
  • Politics of Identity as a Symbolic Politics
  • Political Uses of the Past as Symbolic Politics
  • Politics of Memory from the Comparative Perspective.
  • Politics of Memory in Russia
  • Public Holidays as Tools of Symbolic Politics
  • Social Protest as Symbolic Action
  • Symbolic Politics and International Relations
  • Summary: What We Have Learned about the Technologies of Symbolic Politics
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking In-class Participation
    Lecturers evaluate students’ progress and input to the seminar discussions, when the individual work is implied. The component is calculated as an average grade achieved on the seminars.
  • non-blocking Team Work
    During the course, the students are expected to prepare several practical tasks (projects) that are prepared by mini-groups, and then presented and discussed in class. The component is calculated as an average grade for all group activities. To prepare the practical task, a mini-group needs to select a case for analysis. After it members of the team need to collect material and prepare presentation for 5-7 minutes. The analysis should be focused on the questions suggested by the task. It is strictly recommended to discuss the case before presenting it in the class.If a student proves a valid and documented reason for the absence on the seminar, where Gteam is assessed, his / her mark equals the team grade, provided he / she gives a detailed explanation of his / her contribution to the group presentation in a written form, and provided other members of the team confirm this explanation.
  • non-blocking Essay
    Each student is supposed to write an essay analyzing the exposition of the exhibition/museum from the recommended list. The essay is to be submitted via LMS no later than 2 weeks before the final class.
  • non-blocking Final Exam
    The final exam is organized during the session period and is conducted in a test form, including open questions. The test is done in the class and should be completed for 1 hour 20 minutes.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (3 module)
    0.3 * Essay + 0.3 * Final Exam + 0.2 * In-class Participation + 0.2 * Team Work
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Assmann, J. (2013). Communicative and cultural memory. Germany, Europe. https://doi.org/10.11588/propylaeumdok.00003860
  • Bourdieu, P. (1985). The Social Space and the Genesis of Groups. Theory & Society, 14(6), 723–744. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00174048
  • Castells, M. (2010). The Power of Identity (Vol. 2nd ed., with a new preface). Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=304250
  • Davies, J. C. (1965). The Symbolic Uses of Politics. By Murray Edelman. (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1964. Pp. 201. $5.00.). American Political Science Review, (03), 695. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsrep&AN=edsrep.a.cup.apsrev.v59y1965i03p695.696.08
  • Marc Howard Ross. (2012). Culture and Belonging in Divided Societies : Contestation and Symbolic Landscapes. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1648011
  • Olick, J. K. (1999). Collective Memory: The Two Cultures. Sociological Theory, 17(3), 333. https://doi.org/10.1111/0735-2751.00083
  • Orleans, P. (1965). THE SYMBOLIC USES OF POLITICS. By Murray Edelman. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1964. 201 pp. $5.00. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.CF104C0A
  • Pierre Bourdieu. (1990). Social space and symbolic power. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.6DE8691
  • Triandafyllidou, A., & Wodak, R. (2003). Conceptual and methodological questions in the study of collective identities. Journal of Language & Politics, 2(2), 205–223. https://doi.org/10.1075/jlp.2.2.02tri

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Bell, D. S. (2003). Mythscapes: memory, mythology, and national identity. British Journal of Sociology, 54(1), 63–81. https://doi.org/10.1080/0007131032000045905
  • Bernstein, M. (2005). Identity Politics. Annual Review of Sociology, 31, 47–74. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.soc.29.010202.100054
  • Grady, T. (2009). ’They died for Germany’ : Jewish soldiers, the German army and conservative debates about the Nazi past in the 1960s. European History Quarterly, 39(1), 27–46. https://doi.org/10.1177/0265691408097365
  • Kaufman, S. J. (2006). Symbolic Politics or Rational Choice? International Security, 30(4), 45–86. https://doi.org/10.1162/isec.2006.30.4.45
  • Mälksoo, M. (2014). Criminalizing Communism: Transnational Mnemopolitics in Europe. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.8A081057
  • Semenenko, I. (2015). Ethnicities, Nationalism and the Politics of Identity: Shaping the Nation in Russia. Europe-Asia Studies, 67(2), 306–326. https://doi.org/10.1080/09668136.2014.1002681
  • Shevel, O. (2011). Russian Nation-building from Yel’tsin to Medvedev: Ethnic, Civic or Purposefully Ambiguous? Europe-Asia Studies, 63(2), 179–202. https://doi.org/10.1080/09668136.2011.547693
  • VALK, J. (2015). The “Kimono Wednesday” Protests Identity Politics and How the Kimono Became More Than Japanese. Asian Ethnology, 74(2), 379–399. https://doi.org/10.18874/ae.74.2.07