• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site
Bachelor 2019/2020

International Security

Type: Elective course (Political Science and World Politics)
Area of studies: Political Science
When: 4 year, 3 module
Mode of studies: Full time
Instructors: Vera Ageeva
Language: English
ECTS credits: 5

Course Syllabus

Abstract

The primary goal of this class is to provide students with an overview of the major contemporary issues in international security as well as an understanding of the field of “security studies”. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with a number of security-related topics, including terrorism, cyber warfare, and nuclear proliferation. Class will also cover how policy-makers approach these subjects, and whether there are differences in how these issues are addressed in different parts of the world and why this maybe the case
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • The primary goal of this class is to provide students with an overview of the major contemporary issues in international security as well as an understanding of the field of “security studies”.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Able to solve professional problems based on synthesis and analysis
  • Able to outlines the need for resources and plan its using for solving professional problems
  • student is able to work in team
  • Able to conduct professional activities internationally
  • Student is capable of executing applied analysis of the political phenomena and political processes - by using political science methods - and in support of practical decision making process
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Introduction class. Theoretical approaches to the Study of International Security
  • International security organizations
  • Causes of wars
  • Military interventions and peacekeeping
  • Terrorism
  • Nuclear Weapons and Nuclear Deterrence
  • Arms Control and Disarmament
  • Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Weapons
  • Space Security
  • Case studies (Caribbean crisis, Vietnam War, Arab-Israeli conflict, the Yugoslav wars, conflict in Rwanda, India-Pakistan conflict, Afghanistan war, Invasion in Iraq, Libya intervention, Syrian conflict, Chinese territorial disputes, conflicts in Arab world)
  • Test
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Participation in class discussion
    Oral participation in class discussion will be based on lectures and home readings. Each class student must provide at least 2 solid oral answers to seminar questions. Maximum for each seminar is 2 points, for oral participation in the course – 36 points.
  • non-blocking Presentation on case-study
    Full list of case-studies and guidelines to them will be provided by teacher. Presentation must be prepared by a group of students (3-4). Each student must take part in presentation. Maximum for case-study presentation is 35 points.
  • non-blocking Test
    Final test will cover lectures, home readings and case-studies. It will bring 29 points. Final score will correspond to the following grades: 100-98 points – 10 97-94 points – 9 93-90 points – 8 89-85 points – 7 84-80 points – 6 79-70 points – 5 69-60 points – 4 59-50 points – 3 49-40 points – 2 29 and less – 1 No exam fill follow the course.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (3 module)
    0.36 * Participation in class discussion + 0.35 * Presentation on case-study + 0.29 * Test
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Power in the 21st century : international security and international political economy in a changing world / Enrico Fels ... eds. (2012). Berlin: Springer. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edswao&AN=edswao.363720634
  • The Oxford handbook of international security edited by Alexandra Gheciu and William C. Wohlforth. (2018). Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edswao&AN=edswao.505154358

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Eichler, J. (2016). War, Peace and International Security : From Sarajevo to Crimea. [Place of publication not identified]: Palgrave Macmillan. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1436736
  • Hogan, W. N. (1955). International Conflict and Collective Security. [Lexington]: The University Press of Kentucky. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=938763