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Master 2020/2021

Archaeology of Western and Central Europe to the North of the Alps in the 1 Millenium AD

Type: Elective course (Classical and Oriental Archaeology)
Area of studies: History
When: 2 year, 2, 3 module
Mode of studies: offline
Open to: students of one campus
Master’s programme: Античная и восточная археология
Language: English
ECTS credits: 3

Course Syllabus

Abstract

The subject of this course is an examination of archaeological cultures of the Bronze and Iron Age in Western and Central Europe (Hallstatt, La Tene, archaeology of Roman provinces). The main focus of this course is on chronology and cultural typology of the archaeological evidences.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • The main aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of research of basic archaeological complexes and main scientific schools and methods.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • The main historiographical problems of the research in the fiel of the Roman Iron Age in Europe will be discussed. Archaeological evidences will be analysed in comparison with the narratives of ancient and medieval historians.
  • The main question of this topis is what archaeological evidences may tell us about migrations in Europe in the post-Roman period. History of research of early medieval settlements and burials are of particular interest.
  • The archaeological evidences of the later first millennium AD will be discussed in comparison with the archaeological sites of the Roman period.
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • The Roman Iron Age in Europe and the Roman Empire
    The Roman Iron Age: archaeology and Roman sources. The Roman expansion into Western and Central Europe. The Roman army. Romanization and acculturation. Towns and countryside. Archaeology of daily life. The Late Roman transformation.
  • Migration Period and the post-Roman period in Europe
    First millennium mobility and migrations. Conquest or accommodation: patterns of migration, landnam, assimilation and acculturation. Continuity and discontinuity of Roman life north of the Alps. Early medieval settlements and burials. The European periphery.
  • The later first millennium AD in Europe
    Factors of change in early medieval Europe. Religious change: the spread of Christianity. Social change: the rise of kingdoms and state formation. Economic change: trade and new urbanism. Viking raiding, trading, settling. Europe on the threshold of the Middle Ages.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Seminars
  • non-blocking Essay
  • non-blocking Exam
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (3 module)
    0.25 * Essay + 0.5 * Exam + 0.25 * Seminars
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Alcock, L. (1987). Economy, Society, and Warfare Among the Britons and Saxons. Cardiff: University of Wales. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=27213
  • Campbell, J. (2004). Wics: The Early Medieval Trading Centres of Northern Europe. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.FEB19BB5
  • Champion, T. (1983). Dark Age Economics, by Richard Hodges. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.C9E5D74B
  • Esmonde Cleary, A. S. (2000). The Ending of Roman Britain. London: Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=84287
  • Hamerow, H. (2002). Early Medieval Settlements : The Archaeology of Rural Communities in Northwest Europe, 400-900. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=150000
  • Hamerow, H. (2004). Early Medieval Settlements : The Archaeology of Rural Communities in North-West Europe 400-900. Oxford: OUP Oxford. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=572677
  • Sawyer, P. H. (1998). From Roman Britain to Norman England (Vol. 2nd ed). London: Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=77173
  • Smith, J. M. H. (2005). Europe After Rome : A New Cultural History 500-1000. Oxford: OUP Oxford. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=179866

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Alcock, L. (1989). Economy, Society, and Warfare among the Britons and Saxons (Book Review). American Historical Review, 94(3), 744. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=f5h&AN=5658547
  • Bourgeois Jean. (1992). A. S. Esmonde Cleary, The Ending of Roman Britain. L’antiquité Classique, (1), 765. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsper&AN=edsper.antiq.0770.2817.1992.num.61.1.1155.t1.0765.0000.2
  • Frank, R. (1979). P. H. SAWYER. From Roman Britain to Norman England. New York: St. Martin’s Press. 1978. Pp. 294. $19.95. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.E2F87A4B
  • Greenberg, D. S., & Greenberg, D. S. (2001). Patients’ Bill of Rights moves ahead on US political agenda. Lancet, 357(9273), 2033. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(00)05170-9