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Regular version of the site
2017/2018

Freedom of Assembly: Comparative Practices

Category 'Best Course for Broadening Horizons and Diversity of Knowledge and Skills'
Type: Minor
When: 1, 2 module
Language: English
ECTS credits: 5

Course Syllabus

Abstract

The course will examine the ways in which rights, language, and public space have been linked together in ideas about democracy. What is 'freedom of speech', what is the “freedom of assembly?» Is there a right to say anything? Is there the right to speak publicly and what is the role of peaceful demonstration and non-violent process in the regime transformation? We will investigate who has had these rights, where it has come from, and what it has had to do with current crises of democracy. Is an encounter with the fact of language, which belongs to no one and can be appropriated by anyone, at the heart of democracy? The crucial role of public activity, “street politics” as well as representation In asking about the status of the speaking (and doing something publicly) human subject, we will ask about the ways in which the subject of rights, and indeed the thought of human rights itself, derives from a political and legal experience. These questions will be examined, if not answered, across a variety of political and legal cases.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • Know the major concepts of public policy – freedom of speech and freedom of assembly
  • Be able to recognize the main controversy between these rights and other types of rights and freedoms
  • Be able to apply standards of freedom of speech and assembly and implement it into the various situations
  • Be able to distinguish between infringements of law and human rights violations
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Understand the main definitions of freedom of assembly and the guiding principles that inform the use of the concept of ‘freedom of assembly’ in public policy and related academic fields.
  • To gain an understanding of some of the most important historical and contemporary cases of the exercise of freedom of assembly.
  • To explain the historical emergence of freedom of assembly in terms of civil and political rights, and how peaceful assembly might figure in contrasts between two ‘kinds’ of rights – civil and political on the one hand and economic, cultural and social on the other.
  • To locate the concepts and examples of political assemblies broached in this course in wider debates about civil society covered elsewhere in the master’s programme.
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Understanding Assemblies : Characteristics and limitations
  • Regulating Assemblies : Overview of Legislating History
  • International Institutions regulating Assemblies OSCE/ ODIHR. Guidelines on Freedom of Peaceful Assemblies
  • Different Publics as Assembly Participants - cases of Publics as Policy Actors around the world
  • Assembly as an event of public communication: communicants, purposes, slogans
  • The connection between freedom of assembly and freedom of expression. Possible regulations of freedom of expression.
  • Verbal aggression and hate speech in public: strategies and results.
  • Types of offensive utterances, public and official reactions.
  • Linguistic expertise: European and Russian practice.
  • Space, Rights, and Politics. Authoritarian and Democratic use of public space.
  • Civil rights movement and non-violent resistance. Martin Luther King Jr. and Nelson Mandela.
  • Freedom of assembly and its limits: Skokie case
  • Religion and public space: the case of Pussy Riot.
  • Art and freedom of assembly: battle for public space.
  • New challenges for public space: right to city, “angry citizens”, and vigilantes.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Active participation
  • non-blocking Presentations
  • non-blocking Essay
  • non-blocking Multiple choice test
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (4 module)
    0.2 * Active participation + 0.3 * Essay + 0.2 * Multiple choice test + 0.3 * Presentations
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Ewing, K. D. (1986). The Right to Strike. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.BDE47FE6
  • Inazu, J. D. (2012). Liberty’s Refuge : The Forgotten Freedom of Assembly. New Haven, Conn: Yale University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=568232
  • Johan Galtung. (1969). Violence, Peace, and Peace Research. Journal of Peace Research, (3), 167. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsrep&AN=edsrep.a.sae.joupea.v6y1969i3p167.191

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Jarman, N., & Hamilton, M. (2009). Protecting Peaceful Protest: The OSCE/ODIHR and Freedom of Peaceful Assembly. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.529BE5B1
  • Susan L. Kang. (2012). Human Rights and Labor Solidarity : Trade Unions in the Global Economy. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1648396