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Regular version of the site
2019/2020

Islamic Factor in the Developments of Eastern Civilizations

Category 'Best Course for Broadening Horizons and Diversity of Knowledge and Skills'
Category 'Best Course for New Knowledge and Skills'
Type: Mago-Lego
When: 3, 4 module
Instructors: Andrey Chuprygin
Language: English
ECTS credits: 3

Course Syllabus

Abstract

The course is intended for the Master's programmes for students interested in Islam, it's emergence, spread and development. Through lectures and seminars (colloquiums) the students will obtain knowledge of how the socio-economic and political revolution of Islam came about in the Arid Belt of Saudi Arabia. Discussions will rotate around factors which played main role in the fast spread of Islam through foreign lands, creating one of the biggest empires in the history of humanity. Different modes of islamisation of new territories will be discussed as well as interaction of Islamic doctrine with the local customs and traditions. The topic will then venture into the territory of the Islamic Zones in an attempt to comprehend different forms of Islamic practices in different parts of the world, like Turkey, Iran, Indonesia and, of course, the mainland of the Arabian Peninsular. In the closing sessions the overview of the Islamisation of Europe, migration issues and the problem of violent manifestations in contemporary Islamic Societies will be studied.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • To provide student with a comprehensive knowledge of the history of Islam and its influence on the socio- economic and political development of Eastern countries and beyond.
  • To provide students with the relevant means of further conducting research into the topics related to Islamic heritage and contemporaneity.
  • To hone students' skills and abilities in scientific research field, specifically through studying Islamic research cases.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Analyses the founding ideas of traditional Islamic historiography, both classical and contemporary
  • Holds an objective understanding of diverse approaches to studies of Islamic heritage in traditional Islamic thought and mainstream Western academia.
  • Able to evaluate the central set of ideas, both Muslim and non-Muslim, on Islam’s relation with the development of Eastern civilisations.
  • Develops a comparative understanding of the political and cultural contexts in which Islam has emerged as a majority and minority in different cultures and the challenges in politics and society to which Islam has responded and/or exacerbated.
  • Masters skills in writing historical and political briefs.
  • Writes comprehensive research on Islamism and political movements in Islamic World
  • Participates in academic debates and discussions on topics covering Islam, its history, orthodoxy and innovation, Political Islam and violent movements, traditionalists against reformists.
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Birth of Islam and Creation of Caliphate. Umayyad and Abbasside Dynasties and spreading of Faith
    The story of Mohammad’s revelations. First years in Mecca. The Hijrah. The Medina Charter and foundations of Islamic Governance. Umayyad Caliphate and the Great Conquests. The Abbasside Revolution. Science and Arts of the Caliphate. Belle Lettre and spread of Islam as a result of media breakthrough and the myth of the “Golden Age”. Cosmopolitanism and Idiosyncrasies of the Caliphate succession. Spectacular rise and tragic fall of the biggest empire.
  • Seven "Zones of Islam", Characteristics and peculiarities
    The role that Islamic history plays in modern Muslim societies and the quest for the answers to three important questions: What happened, How do we know this and Why do these answers matter? How do Muslims and Westerners define the borders and limits of the history of Islam? Is it the history of Religion or the history of Civilization? What role natural and human factors played through the known history of Islam?
  • Cultural, educational and religious implications of Islamic impact on the ethnic majorities. Cross- influence of local and “imported” beliefs. Shaping of “localized” religious trends, acquired traditions in common interactions, literature, architecture and business conduct
    Novelty and traditionalism in Islamic message, the role played by Sufi missionaries in adaptation of Islamic codes to the local cultural and social traditions. Influence of conquered on the conquerors. Islam vs Zoroastrism; Persian influence and "Turkiq Islam"; Slave kings of India and Deobandi movement.
  • Countries with Islamic majority. Socio-political and economic characteristics. Role-play and models.
    "Native" Islam of Arabian Peninsula vs Indonesian, Malasian and Hindu-Pakistani concepts. State-building and State-demolition in historical retrospect. Trading societies and sea-faring nations in Islamic culture; Islamic governance concept and the fate of the non-believers. Islamic discourse and modern nation-state: pros and cons of the conundrum.
  • Localized Muslim communities: influencing host countries. Problems, solutions and future prospects
    Assimilation as opposed to the "closed gates" communities and the challenges of interaction between Muslim minorities in the host countries. Problems faced by the host countries on the communal, municipal and state levels. Role played by NGOs, religious institutions and community elders councils and the future of a dialogue in a potentially inflammable environment.
  • Notion of Umma. Pan-Islamism and political activity of Islamic movements
    The concept of Umma in historical perspective. Pan-Islamism of the first half of the 20th Century and the shaping of the Global Political Islam. Contemporary Islamist movements and their role in setting political agendas in the East.
  • Course conclusion and Workshop
    Free discussion on subjects studied during course hours. Q&A and light debates on controversy topics
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Seminars Participation
  • non-blocking Essay
    student uploads his essay to LMS. In this case, short-term and long-term violations of the Internet connection do not matter.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (4 module)
    0.7 * Essay + 0.3 * Seminars Participation
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Lapidus, I. M. . (DE-588)124445977, (DE-576)294175717. (2014). A history of Islamic societies / Ira M. Lapidus. New York: Cambridge University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edswao&AN=edswao.425657388
  • Silverstein, A. J. (2010). Islamic History: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: OUP Oxford. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=303939

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Brown, L. C. (2000). Religion and State : The Muslim Approach to Politics. New York: Columbia University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=74609
  • Green, R. (2018). Debates on the Rise of Islamist Extremism. San Diego, CA: ReferencePoint Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1849550
  • Jajat Burhanudin. (2014). The Making of Islamic Political Tradition in the Malay World. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.8F15CE56
  • Rice Jr. Earle. (2018). Muslim Brotherhood. [N.p.]: Mitchell Lane. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=2183653
  • Tolan, J. V. (2019). Faces of Muhammad : Western Perceptions of the Prophet of Islam From the Middle Ages to Today. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1983650