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Regular version of the site
2019/2020

Global Communication: A Critical Perspective

Category 'Best Course for Broadening Horizons and Diversity of Knowledge and Skills'
Category 'Best Course for New Knowledge and Skills'
Type: Mago-Lego
Delivered by: School of Media
When: 4 module
Instructors: Olga Baysha
Language: English
ECTS credits: 3

Course Syllabus

Abstract

Globalization refers to all the processes by which the citizens of different nation-states are incorporated into a single global society. Since these processes are multiple and non-linear, there are as many conceptualizations of globalization as there are academic disciplines. There is a widely shared understanding, however, that media and communication technologies are central to all global transformations. It is communication technologies that establish global networks, producing complex configurations of “the local” and “the global,” “the traditional” and “the modern,” or “the social” and “the natural.” The aim of this course is to present globalization as a synthesis of several disciplinary approaches with an emphasis on communication and media. The course is divided into two parts. The first presents globalization as westernization and modernization – an outlook implying that the history of globalization starts with the history of the West. During the first part of the semester, we will examine the limitations of this perspective and the problems associated with it: racism, orientalism, and so forth. In this first part of the course, we will focus on the discursive constructions of a globalized social reality. We will also analyze the role of media in constructing and reproducing the “normalized” visions of the modern globalized world. The second part of the course presents contemporary issues of global network society: the emergence of the global market system, the rise of the fourth world, the formation of supranational public spheres, and the spread of global social movements. None of these developments would have been possible but for global communication networks, the analysis of which will be central to our class discussions durint the second part of the course.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • To introduce you to the history of globalization and to assist you in learning how to approach and analyze complex social issues related to the formation of global network society.
  • To help you critically examine many of our own values that we usually take for granted, i.e. those involved in our interactions with people of other cultures.
  • To introduce you to the theory of discourse as a method of investigating “normalized” understandings of various aspects of globalized modernity.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • To be able to identify the basic stage of globalization.
  • To be able to evaluate critically the legacy of colonialism of the formation of the West-centric social imaginary.
  • To be able to discuss argumentatively various theories of modernization and development.
  • To be able to employ discourse-analytical tools to analyze hegemonic discursive constructions.
  • To be able to de-construct the hegemony of taken-for-granted values and beliefs.
  • To be able to de-construct the discourses of colonialism and neoliberalism.
  • To be able to de-construct Cold-War discourses.
  • To be able to identify propagandistic messages, deconstruct them, and evaluate their origins from the vantage point of the Propaganda Model by Herman and Chomsky.
  • To be able to name the components of the global communication infrastructure.
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Introduction: Main Concepts. Globalization. Culture. Discourse.
  • The legacy of colonialism. The West and the Rest.
  • Modernization & ‘Otherness’.
  • Cold-War discourses.
  • Power & International relations: Realism vs. Idealism
  • Managing Information Space. Global Communication Infrastructure.
  • Managing Information Space. Propaganda Model.
  • The neoliberal order and global resistance.
  • The Clash of Civilization. The Clash of Ignorance?
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Final Exam
  • non-blocking Midterm exam
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (4 module)
    0.5 * Final Exam + 0.5 * Midterm exam
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Noam Chomsky. (2015). Propaganda and the Public Mind : Interviews by David Barsamian. London: Pluto Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1057637

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Said, E. (2004). Orientalism Once More. Development & Change, 35(5), 869–879. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7660.2004.00383.x