• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site
Bachelor 2020/2021

History of Arctic and Baltic Region

Type: Elective course (History)
Area of studies: History
Delivered by: Department of History
When: 3 year, 1, 2 module
Mode of studies: offline
Open to: students of all HSE University campuses
Language: English
ECTS credits: 4

Course Syllabus

Abstract

The course examines the key developments of two regions with specific history and natural environments - the Baltic Sea region and the Arctic. The course is designed in a chronological order and split themati-cally into a few parts covering political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental changes. During the course, the students will find many comparisons of regional developments examining how various stakehold-ers determined local developments. The classes cover the period from the medieval period until the end of the 20th century. The course is based on interdisciplinary approaches combining analytical tools and models of technological, economic, political, cultural and environmental history. It attempts to answer the question of what interests are intertwined in these regions and how they reflect the practices of cooperation and confrontation between states, organizations, scientists and societies. To this end, the course will address such issues as the identity of the Baltic region and the role of historians in the construction of images of the Baltic and Arctic, urbanization and Baltic and Arctic cities, the cultural heritage of the Baltic, the colonization of the Russian North, Svalbard in the context of transnational history, the colonization of the Scandinavian Arctic, indige-nous peoples and national rights, industrialization, polar research, envi-ronmental problems of the Baltic region and the Arctic.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • Understand basic problems of transnational history of the Arctic and the Baltic region. Get acquainted with contemporary discussions on history of these regions.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • know key research works on the history and present of the Baltic region the Arctic and develop their abilities to evaluate critically research performed by others
  • know key events, political, cultural and economic processes of history of the regions
  • Know the methodologies required for dissertational research and basic competences.
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • The Arctic: Introduction. Geography, environmental problems, international organizations in the Arctic
  • Colonization and exploration of the Arctic
  • Colonization of the European North of Russia. Spitsbergen in transnational history
  • Siberia and Russian America
  • Polar science, international cooperation in the Arctic, end of the 19th – first half of the 20th cc.
  • Economics of the Arctic: Resources, Voices and Governance
  • Cold War in the Arctic
  • Indigenous people in the Arctic
  • Arctic Heritage and Tourism
  • Introduction: the Baltic region
  • Baltic and the Ocean space. Early Modern Baltic commerce, Atlantic trade and the economic globalization
  • The Gulf of Finland in the economy, culture and identity of St. Petersburg.
  • Links and conflicts of memory: shared and discussed heritage in the Baltic rim
  • Facets of National Identities in the Baltic
  • Arena of conflict in the world wars and interwar period
  • Baltic Urban Development. The Cold War in the region
  • Сooperation in the Baltic region, 19-21st centuries and regional identity
  • Ecological problems and international cooperation on the Baltic
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking In-class Participation
  • non-blocking written review essay
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (2 module)
    0.5 * In-class Participation + 0.5 * written review essay
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • BRÜGGEMANN, K., & WEZEL, K. (2019). Nationally Indifferent or Ardent Nationalists? On the Options for Being German in Russia’s Baltic Provinces, 1905-17. Kritika: Explorations in Russian & Eurasian History, 20(1), 39–62. https://doi.org/10.1353/kri.2019.0002
  • Cinis, A., Drėmaitė, M., & Kalm, M. (2008). Perfect Representations of Soviet Planned Space. Scandinavian Journal of History, 33(3), 226–246. https://doi.org/10.1080/03468750802079409
  • Grzechnik, M. (2012). Making Use of the Past: The Role of Historians in Baltic Sea Region Building. Journal of Baltic Studies, 43(3), 329–343. https://doi.org/10.1080/01629778.2011.644903
  • McCannon, J. (2012). A History of the Arctic : Nature, Exploration and Exploitation. London: Reaktion Books. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=538545
  • Schweitzer, P., & Povoroznyuk, O. (2019). A right to remoteness? A missing bridge and articulations of indigeneity along an East Siberian railroad. https://doi.org/10.1111/1469-8676.12648

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • AVANGO, D., & SKÖLD, P. (2018). The Making of the European Arctic: Introduction. Journal of Northern Studies, 12(2), 7–10.
  • Avango, D., Högselius, P., & Vikström, H. (2015). Colonizing the poles.
  • Buckley, K. (1958). The Role of Staple Industries in Canada’s Economic Development. The Journal of Economic History, (04), 439. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsrep&AN=edsrep.a.cup.jechis.v18y1958i04p439.450.10
  • Bunker, S. G. (1989). Staples, Links, and Poles in the Construction of Regional Development Theories. Sociological Forum, 4(4), 589. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01115065
  • Cinis, A., Drėmaitė, M., & Kalm, M. (2008). Perfect Representations of Soviet Planned Space. Scandinavian Journal of History, 33(3), 226–246. https://doi.org/10.1080/03468750802079409
  • Stjernström, O., Pashkevich, A., & Avango, D. (2020). Contrasting views on co-management of indigenous natural and cultural heritage – Case of Laponia World Heritage site, Sweden. https://doi.org/10.1017/s0032247420000121