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Regular version of the site
Master 2019/2020

The Art of Orientalism

Category 'Best Course for Career Development'
Category 'Best Course for Broadening Horizons and Diversity of Knowledge and Skills'
Category 'Best Course for New Knowledge and Skills'
Area of studies: History of Arts
Delivered by: School of History
When: 2 year, 3 module
Mode of studies: offline
Instructors: Olga Nefedova
Master’s programme: History of Artistic Culture and the Art Market
Language: English
ECTS credits: 4

Course Syllabus

Abstract

During the course different activities will be organized to allow the students to comprehend and familiarize with artworks. The course will offer ample opportunities for discussion to explore the historical and cultural context of the orientalist art. Students will also have opportunities to apply what they have learned across subject areas assisting in the development of future exhibition themes and educational projects. The aim of this course is to provide students with a thorough knowledge of the history of Orientalist art movement, examine the formation, the development and the role of orientalism in fine art history, which although being a predominantly nineteenth century phenomenon, started in the time of the Renaissance and continued throughout the years, emerging in the twenty-first century seen through new forms and techniques, spanning the geographical area of the artists’ interest in Middle Eastern and North African Islamic countries. Course is taught in both the Russian and the English languages.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • Developing students’ writing and analytical competencies through assignments designed around specific writing and speaking activities that gradually lead students to the final production of the analysis of a painting as a narrative text.
  • Developing students’ oral and communication skills.
  • Develop students’ critical thinking related to fine art works and works of applied art.
  • Developing students’ research and methodology skills through portfolio assignment.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • To develop students’ research and methodology skills through portfolio assignment.
  • To develop students’ oral and communication skills
  • To develop students’ critical thinking related to fine art works and works of applied art.
  • To develop students’ writing and analytical competencies through assignments designed around specific writing and speaking activities that gradually lead students to the final production of the analysis of a painting as a narrative text.
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Introduction
    Orientalism and Orientalist Art; The term “orientalism”; Genres within the Orientalist art movement; History of Orientalism.
  • Russian orientalists. Embassies to the Middle East and Orientalism.
    Gavryila Sergeev. Dmitry Efimov (c. 1834). Chernetzov brothers. Vasily Vereschagin. Nikolai Karazin.
  • The ideology of socialist realist art and the Soviet orientalism
    Alexander Volkov. Central Asian school.
  • Education of Arab artists in the USSR.
    Over the course of the 1950s the Soviet Union, like various European governments, created a dedicated program meant to attract Arab artists and scholars from around the world.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking In class participation
  • non-blocking In-class test
  • non-blocking Presentation
  • non-blocking Final exam
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (3 module)
    0.4 * Final exam + 0.24 * In class participation + 0.24 * In-class test + 0.12 * Presentation
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Maria Nikolaevna Tsybizova, & Olga Vadimovna Nefedova. (2019). Analysis of Plots and Sources of Orientalist Motifs in Russian Porcelain of the 18th–19th Centuries. Известия Уральского Федерального Университета. Серия 2: Гуманитарные Науки, (1(184)), 250. https://doi.org/10.15826/izv2.2019.21.1.018
  • Netton, I. R. (2013). Orientalism Revisited : Art, Land and Voyage. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=513529

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Varisco, D. M. (2017). Reading Orientalism : Said and the Unsaid (Vol. 2nd ed). Seattle: University of Washington Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1443943
  • Wilcox, A. (2018). Orientalism and Imperialism : From Nineteenth-Century Missionary Imaginings to the Contemporary Middle East. London: Bloomsbury Academic. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1854408