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Regular version of the site
2020/2021

English for General Academic Purposes. Upper-Intermediate Couse - 1

Language: English
ECTS credits: 3

Course Syllabus

Abstract

The program is for the 1st year students. English for Academic Purposes is designed to develop foreign-language communicative and integrated and critical thinking skills that are based on "Regulations for Interim and Ongoing Assessments of Students at National Research University Higher School of Economics and "Concept of development of English-language communicative competence HSE students". Every student has slightly different needs, depending on their chosen discipline, cultural background and other factors. However, there are main skills, tasks, and academic language that are common to most disciplines and are relevant to the needs of most students preparing to study English at university level. The course is focused on core tasks relevant to all students, such as working out the main points of an academic text or lecture (such perspectives as knowledge, motivation, nature, power and growth). There are no blocking controls.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • to improve student’s ability to read and understand journal articles, texts, lectures from different perspectives
  • to increase student’s comprehension of spoken English
  • to strengthen student’s speaking and writing skills in a range of different disciplines
  • to systematically and progressively develop students’ academic skills, language, and critical thinking
  • to learn topic-based academic vocabulary
  • to develop the students’ general capacity to a level that enables them to use English in their professional and academic environment granted that they are provided with the specific notions and vocabulary in the course of their studies
  • to learn topic-based academic vocabulary
  • to develop the students’ general capacity to a level that enables them to use English in their professional and academic environment granted that they are provided with the specific notions and vocabulary in the course of their studies.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • To form understanding of text structure
  • To improve understanding of dialogues and polylogues on both familiar and unfamiliar topics
  • To develop skills of using basic listening techniques (predicting, understanding main ideas and details)
  • To develop understanding of lectures and learning context
  • To form skills of note-taking
  • Writing an academic e-mail
  • Monologue (informative/descriptive/argumentative/persuasive speech)
  • Writing an essay (opinion, discussion)
  • To develop understanding of articles, reports, straightforward and specialised texts concerned with contemporary problems at the threshold/vantage/effective operational proficiency level
  • Presentation (informative/descriptive/argumentative/persuasive speech)
  • To develop skills of using basic reading techniques skimming and scanning (predicting, understanding main ideas, understanding details)
  • Dialogue on general, academic and professional topics. (active listening, questioning, responding to questions, emphasizing, discussion strategies)
  • Writing a summary of a text
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Topic 1. Knowledge
    Learning and cognitive processes. Understanding and presenting information. Talking about experiences. Writing simple and compound sentences. Present perfect and past simple. Listening: understanding main ideas in a presentation; identifying word class to assist note-taking. Speaking: presenting information about your academic experience and aims. Reading: gaining an overview of an academic text; identifying topics and main ideas. Writing: writing simple and compound sentences. Vocabulary: identifying and using general, academic, and technical vocabulary. Grammar: present perfect and past simple to talk about experiences.
  • Topic 2. Organization and motivation
    Critical thinking, career and success. Perspective and stance in speaking and writing. Definition and explanation in listening and reading. Listening: recognizing signposting language; taking notes. Speaking: identifying, expressing and responding to stance in a discussion. Writing: analysing paragraph structure; writes topic sentences and conclusion sentences. Reading: predicting the purpose of a text; understanding main ideas; recognizing cohesive language; recognizing definitions, explanations, and examples. Vocabulary: evaluative and classifying adjectives. Grammar: pronouns and determiners for cohesion; relative clauses.
  • Topic 3. Nature
    Nature and human activity, environmental problems, ecology, urbanization. Description in texts. Descriptive language. Writing a descriptive paragraph. Using adverbials for cohesion. Listening: listening to seminars; recognizing noun phrases in descriptions. Speaking: referring to numerical information; giving a short presentation and providing peer feedback. Reading: identifying the main ideas; identifies supporting evidence. Writing: analysing, plans and uses notes to build a paragraph; using adverbials to add context and support information to a sentence; writing a descriptive paragraph. Vocabulary: identifying adverbial meanings and uses adverbials for cohesion.
  • Topic 4. Power and growth
    Government and society, media, advertising, globalization, development. Reporting and summarizing in listening and writing. Using sources in speaking and reading. Listening: identifying different positions and supporting arguments in a lecture. Speaking: forming a stance based on a reading; offering and responding to opinions. Reading: identifying and evaluating sources for an essay; identifying author stance on main ideas. Writing: active note-taking strategies; summarizing words and phrases; writing a summary of a short academic text. Vocabulary: suffixes to recognize and build word families. Grammar: present and past tenses.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Written assessment
    SUMMARY ASSESSMENT CRITERIA max 10 points TASK RESPONSE: 3 - All key points are mentioned; 2 - Most key points are mentioned and/or some crucial supporting information is omitted and/or the author’s ideas are partly reflected; 1- Very few key points are mentioned and/or little supporting information is provided and/or very few of the author’s ideas are mentioned, 0 - Only the topic is mentioned and/or no supporting information is provided and/or the author’s ideas are not reflected. VOCABULARY: 2 - The original expressions are paraphrased. A wide range of vocabulary is used. 1-2 lexical mistakes are made; 1 - The original expressions are partly paraphrased and/or an adequate range of vocabulary is used and/or 3-4 lexical mistakes are made; 0 - The original expressions are copied and/or a limited range of vocabulary is used and/or more than 4 lexical mistakes are made. GRAMMAR: 2 - A variety of complex grammar structures is used. No more than 1 punctuation and/or 1-2 grammar mistakes are made; 1 - An attempt to use complex grammar structures is made and/or 3-4 grammar mistakes are made; 0 - Elementary grammar structures are used and/or more than 4 grammar mistakes are made. STRUCTURE: 3 - The text is logically organized. A wide range of transitions is used appropriately; 2 - The text is mostly logically organized and/or an adequate range of transitions is used; 1 - The text may have serious breaches in logic and/or transitions may be over- or underused; 0 - There is no sequence of ideas and/or transitions are used inappropriately or not used at all.
  • non-blocking Oral assessment
  • non-blocking Independent work assessment
  • non-blocking Final assessment
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (2 module)
    0.3 * Final assessment + 0.25 * Independent work assessment + 0.2 * Oral assessment + 0.25 * Written assessment
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Oxford EAP. A course in English for academic purposes. Intermediate/B1+ Student's book (+ DVD), Chazal, E., Rogers, L., 2013

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Oxford grammar for EAP : english grammar and practice for academic purposes with answers, Paterson, K., Wedge, R., 2013