• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site
Bachelor 2021/2022

Law and Economics

Type: Elective course (HSE/NES Programme in Economics)
Area of studies: Economics
Delivered by: HSE/NES Undergraduate Programmes Curriculum Support
When: 4 year, 3, 4 module
Mode of studies: offline
Open to: students of one campus
Language: English
ECTS credits: 6

Course Syllabus

Abstract

How does law shape economics? What implications does legal environment has on economic and political development? What legal institutions promote rule of law? How and why are courts biased? These questions have animated both economists and political scientists since centuries. In this course, we answer these questions by introducing students to the vibrant “law and economics” field. First, we explore what kind of legal institutions promote economic development and democratic accountability? Second, we discuss different determinants of judicial bias and provide evidence for them. The goal of this course, therefore, is to acquaint students with an introduction to law and economics, from an empirical perspective.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • The goal of this course, therefore, is to acquaint students with an introduction to law and economics, from an empirical perspective.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • to analyse how households’ and firms’ supply and demand of products and services are affected by changes in market conditions, such as changes in legal rules
  • to analyse in a qualified way private law problems from a law and economics perspective.
  • to explain the basic theories of law and economic concerning prominent private law topics such as ownership, contract, tort and company law,
  • to explain the content and consequences of different economic definitions of efficiency,
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Part 1: Empirical Analysis of Law and Economics and Conceptual Issues
  • Part 2: Judicial Independence, Political Influence and Development
  • Part 3: Judicial Bias
  • Part 4 (if time): Russian Justice
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking 2-page summary and discussion
    20% of the final grade
  • non-blocking Executive summary with discussion of an academic paper and a take-home exam
    50% of the final grade
  • non-blocking Class participation
    10% of the class
  • non-blocking Write a paper and present in class
    Optionally (replaces take-home exam)
  • non-blocking Class presentation
    20% of the final gradre
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • 2021/2022 3rd module
  • 2021/2022 4th module
    Please keep in mind that if a student receives a failing grade for a course, he or she gets two chances for a make-up. The first make up involves doing the 2-page summary and discussion (20%) i.e. executive summary with discussion of an academic paper and a take-home exam (50%). This is graded by the course instructor. The second make up is another chance to pass the course doing the same assignments. It is important to notice, that the formula for the course grade does not change. So if you do not take part in any assignments then you get zero, then your maximum grade will be 70% grade of retake. If presentation is missed due to a valid reason, the student will be required to hand in a 2-page report on a different paper similar to the mandatory one (summary and discussion of a published article).
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Jean-Bernard AUBY. (2017). Law and Economics.

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Dana Gold. (2009). Law and Economics : Toward Social Justice. Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
  • Posner, R. A., & Yoon, A. H. (2011). What Judges Think of the Quality of Legal Representation. Stanford Law Review, 63(2), 317–349.