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Regular version of the site
Master 2022/2023

Social Network Analysis

Category 'Best Course for Broadening Horizons and Diversity of Knowledge and Skills'
Category 'Best Course for New Knowledge and Skills'
Type: Elective course (Comparative Social Research)
Area of studies: Sociology
Delivered by: School of Sociology
When: 1 year, 3 module
Mode of studies: offline
Open to: students of one campus
Instructors: Anna Semenova
Master’s programme: Comparative Soсial Research
Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
Contact hours: 40

Course Syllabus

Abstract

This course is an introductory course in network analysis, designed to familiarize graduate students with the general concepts and basic techniques of network analysis in political research, gain general knowledge of major theoretical concepts and methodological techniques used in social network analysis (SNA), and get some hands-on experience of collecting, analyzing, and mapping network data with SNA software. In addition, this course will provide ample opportunities to include network concepts in students’ master theses work.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • The goal of the course is to ensure that students understand topics and principles of network analysis
  • The goal of the course is to ensure that students understand topics and principles of network analysis. The basics of this discipline should be used in the following courses and activities: - Master thesis writing - All other program related courses
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Be able to confidently use available data to test proposed network hypotheses
  • Be able to correctly selects appropriate model / method of network analysis for a given problem
  • Be able to develop a solid network theoretical foundation for the project at hand
  • Be able to explore the advantages and disadvantages of various network analytic tools and methods
  • Be able to integrate network information found from various sources and compensate for lack of data by adjusting models
  • Be able to master advanced research methods, including network methods, without direct supervision, and is capable of using these methods to analyze complex models
  • Have the skill to process learned information, and integrate learned material into a cohesive research toolset
  • Have the skills to effectively presents network research ideas to peers, instructors, and general audience
  • Have the skills to expresses network research ideas in English in written and oral communication
  • Know the advantages and disadvantages of various network analytic tools and methods
  • Know the basic principles of network analysis
  • Know the major network modeling programs
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Introduction
  • SNA methodology I
  • SNA methodology II
  • SNA methodology III
  • SNA models I
  • SNA models II
  • SNA models III
  • Conclusion
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking In-Class Labs (9-10 x Varied points)
  • non-blocking Course Project
  • non-blocking Homework Assignments (5 x Varied points)
  • non-blocking Quizzes (Best 9 of 10, Varied points)
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • 2022/2023 3rd module
    0.2 * In-Class Labs (9-10 x Varied points) + 0.5 * Course Project + 0.1 * Quizzes (Best 9 of 10, Varied points) + 0.2 * Homework Assignments (5 x Varied points)
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Carrington, P. J., Scott, J., & Wasserman, S. (2005). Models and Methods in Social Network Analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=132264
  • Newman, M. E. J. (2010). Networks : An Introduction. Oxford: OUP Oxford. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=458550
  • Nooy, W. de, Mrvar, A., & Batagelj, V. (2005). Exploratory Social Network Analysis with Pajek. New York: Cambridge University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=138973

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Newman, M. (2010). Networks: An Introduction. Oxford University Press, 2010