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Regular version of the site
Bachelor 2022/2023

Sociology

Type: Compulsory course (International Business)
Area of studies: Management
When: 1 year, 3 module
Mode of studies: distance learning
Online hours: 20
Open to: students of one campus
Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
Contact hours: 40

Course Syllabus

Abstract

The course is designed to introduce macro-social theories with a special focus on comparative sociology and social development to students specializing in business and management. It will cover a span of topics ranging from cross-country differences in the level of development to the social consequences of capitalism and international competition within countries. The course includes both lectures and seminars during which the students will be able to share and discuss relevant cases from their culture. As a result, the students will learn to use their sociological imagination to better understand the social forces shaping global and regional markets and the globalizing world in general.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • acquaint students with the peculiarities of the sociological understanding of social phenomena and processes, methods of conducting sociological research, and the potential for practical application of the acquired knowledge
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • be able to organize teamwork, distribute responsibility, coordinate and control the work of team members;
  • apply sociological theories to analyze social events and processes shaping the globalizing world in general and specific cases
  • prove their position by giving arguments and examples from real life
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Intro: Comparative Social Studies
  • Early factors of uneven development
  • The origin of the state and social class
  • Effects of state antiquity on crime and economic performance
  • Within-country effects of international competition
  • Health in Comparative Perspective
  • Nationalism
  • Capitalism
  • Modernization
  • Subjective Well-Being in Comparative Perspective
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking In-class test
    After each block of lectures, there will be an in-class test checking the undesrtanding of the material delivered on that day. The results for all tests will be averaged.
  • non-blocking Presentation and Leading Class Discussion
    You will be scheduled to present readings and lead discussion. On the assigned day, you are expected to give a PowerPoint presentation about the readings which includes a) a summary of the main points of the readings, b) definitions of key concepts used in the readings, and 3) between 2-4 questions related to the readings for class discussion. Depending on the group size, presentations may be prepared and delivered by several students, which will be anounced during the first seminar.
  • non-blocking Participating in Class Discussions
    You will also be evaluated for your contributions to class discussion over the course of the module. Make sure you read materials closely and critically and think about them prior to each class meeting so that you are prepared to participate in class. The quality of your learning experience will hinge upon what each student brings to the classroom.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • 2022/2023 3rd module
    0.4 * In-class test + 0.2 * Participating in Class Discussions + 0.4 * Presentation and Leading Class Discussion
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Ronald F. Inglehart. (2017). Evolutionary Modernization Theory: Why People’s Motivations are Changing. Changing Societies & Personalities, (2), 136. https://doi.org/10.15826/csp.2017.1.2.010
  • Sociology, Giddens, A., 2017

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Diamond, J. (2003). Guns, Germs, and Steel in 2003. Antipode, 35(4), 829–831. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1467-8330.2003.00357.x
  • Foa, R. S., Inglehart, R., Ponarin, E., & Karabchuk, T. (2018). Set-Point Theory and Societal Collapse: The Case of Russia. Journal of Happiness Studies, 19(6), 1639–1656. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-017-9888-4