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Regular version of the site
Bachelor 2023/2024

Readings in Urban Studies

Type: Compulsory course (Urban Planning)
Area of studies: Urban Planning
Delivered by: Vysokovsky Graduate School of Urbanism
When: 3 year, 1, 2 module
Mode of studies: offline
Open to: students of one campus
Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
Contact hours: 56

Course Syllabus

Abstract

The "Readings in Urban Studies" course aims to cultivate students' critical and analytical skills when engaging with academic texts, research articles, policy documents, and news related to urban issues. Through various reading assignments, guided discussions, and activities, students will adopt a critical mindset to explore diverse perspectives, evaluate arguments, and assess the reliability and validity of research findings and policy recommendations using evidence-based reasoning. Furthermore, analysing current urban news will foster students' ability to scrutinise media narratives and grasp the broader implications of urban policies and developments. Course emphasis includes concise and clear writing, the skills to annotate, summarise, and synthesise complex information, and persuasive speaking. The course explores a range of urban studies topics, such as urban planning, urban geography, urban sociology, urban economics, urban politics, urban design, sustainable urban development, and visions for future cities. By applying advanced analytical and critical thinking skills to real-world urban issues, students will develop a nuanced understanding of the complexities and challenges inherent in studying urban environments and urban planning. This skill set will enable them to become proficient critical thinkers and contribute meaningfully to ongoing academic and policy debates in urban studies.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • enhance proficiency in reading, comprehending, and analysing academic texts, research articles, policy documents, and current news related to urban studies. This includes extracting essential information, annotating and summarising complex information, identifying key arguments, evaluating evidence and methodology, assessing the overall credibility and relevance of the sources, and synthesising information from multiple sources.
  • foster critical thinking skills by engaging with different perspectives and theories in the field of urban studies. Students will be able to critically evaluate arguments, identify logical fallacies, and construct valid and compelling counterarguments through writing and speaking.
  • develop written communication skills by producing clear, concise, and persuasive critical and analytical texts on urban studies. This includes developing a coherent structure, effectively integrating evidence from various sources, and demonstrating the ability to articulate complex ideas in a concise and engaging manner.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • apply effective strategies for note-taking, annotation, and summarisation when engaging with academic texts, research articles, policy documents, and current news in urban studies
  • use advanced skills in analytical reading by consistently engaging with a wide range of academic texts, research articles, policy documents, and current news related to urban studies
  • identify and critically evaluate different perspectives, arguments, and methodologies presented in academic texts, research articles, policy documents, and current news, with a particular focus on their relevance and implications for urban studies
  • identify and evaluate assumptions, biases, limitations, and logical fallacies present in academic texts, research articles, policy documents, and current news related to urban studies
  • apply critical thinking skills to analyse and synthesise complex information from multiple sources in order to develop well-reasoned and evidence-based arguments related to urban studies
  • showcase advanced academic writing skills by producing critical and analytical texts that demonstrate clarity, coherence, and logical organisation, utilising appropriate citation and referencing methods
  • engage in constructive discussions and debates by articulating well-reasoned arguments based on readings in urban studies
  • demonstrate a deeper understanding of the key concepts, theories, current research and debates in urban studies by applying advanced analytical reading and critical thinking skills
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Course introduction
  • Introduction to Urban Studies
  • Urban Planning: History, Theory, Practice
  • Urban Space: Urban Geography and Urban Sociology
  • Economics and Urban Studies
  • Political Science and Urban Studies
  • Environmental Science and Urban Studies
  • Design and Urban Studies
  • Visions for Future Cities
  • Writing urban policy
  • Crafting effective Policy Briefs on urban issues
  • Capstone Projects Presentations. Discussion of Policy Briefs.
  • Course wrap-up. Class survey.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Reading Assignment Quizzes
  • non-blocking Class Discussion of an Assigned Reading
  • non-blocking Home Assignments
  • non-blocking Critique
  • non-blocking Capstone Project
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • 2023/2024 2nd module
    Syllabus Total = Reading Assignment Quizzes х 0,2 + Class Discussions х 0,2 + Home Assignments х 0,2 +Critique х 0,2 + Capstone Project х 0,2.
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Boys, J. D., & Keating, M. F. (2009). The Policy Brief: Building Practical and Academic Skills in International Relations and Political Science. Politics, 29(3), 201–208. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9256.2009.01356.x
  • Brueckner, J. K. (2011). Lectures on Urban Economics. Cambridge, Mass: The MIT Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=400828
  • Edward Glaeser. (2012). Viewpoint: Triumph of the City. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.A2D0F4E8
  • Henri Lefebvre. (2012). The Right to the City. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.2E8A262C
  • International encyclopedia of human geography. (2009). Elsevier.
  • Mele, C., & Lin, J. (2013). The Urban Sociology Reader. London: Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=506535
  • O’Sullivan, A., Arnott, R., Scott, A., Berliant, M., & Lucas, R. E. (2006). Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Volume 4: Cities and Geography * Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, vol. 4: a road map * Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, vol. 4: a retrospective * Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, vol. 4: a view from geography * Well isn’t that spatial?! Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, vol. 4: a view from economic theory * Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, vol. 4: theory and observation. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.7FC6AD51
  • The urban design reader, , 2013
  • Wheeler, S., & Beatley, T. (2004). The Sustainable Urban Development Reader. London: Taylor & Francis [CAM]. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=105298

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Bailey, S. (2015). Academic Writing : A Handbook for International Students (Vol. Fourth edition). Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=862062
  • Bailey, S. (2017). Academic Writing : A Handbook for International Students (Vol. Fifth edition). London: Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1650435