• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site

Student
Title
Supervisor
Faculty
Educational Programme
Final Grade
Year of Graduation
Anastasiia Belinskaia
Interplay Between Multiple Object Statistics in the Perception of visual Ensembles
Psychology
(Bachelor’s programme)
10
2016
Observers are good at rapid extraction of summary statistics at a very brief glance at multiple objects. Although this ability is well documented for item numerosity, the average feature or variance in separate domains, less is known about the general cognitive architecture of statistical processing in vision (Haberman, Brady, & Alvarez, 2015). We studied individual differences in the ability to judge different statistical properties to establish whether there can be a single factor affecting the precision of statistical judgments (“statistical module”). Our participants (N = 93, 51 women, mean age = M=19,53) performed three tests requiring them to compare two sets of briefly presented dots to determine which one (1) was more numerous, (2) had larger mean size, or (3) had greater size variability. As size was a relevant dimension, we also evaluated rapid size discrimination in a popout visual search task which required detection of a size singleton in a display similar to our ensemble tasks. Serial visual search for a size target was also added to evaluate whether “statistical abilities” are related to attention. We found in the result a moderate correlation between the accuracy of numerosity and mean judgments (r=.385) but not with variance. All statistics turned out to be correlated with the accuracy of detecting a size singleton (r = .287-.534) and one of serial visual search (r = .238-.438). Overall, these extensive correlations suggest that it can be a low-level factor of individual differences (size discriminability) potentially explaining the observed correlation between number estimation and averaging. It does not require postulating a single “statistical module” in vision. However, additional research is required for more certain claims about this.

Student Theses at HSE must be completed in accordance with the University Rules and regulations specified by each educational programme.

Summaries of all theses must be published and made freely available on the HSE website.

The full text of a thesis can be published in open access on the HSE website only if the authoring student (copyright holder) agrees, or, if the thesis was written by a team of students, if all the co-authors (copyright holders) agree. After a thesis is published on the HSE website, it obtains the status of an online publication.

Student theses are objects of copyright and their use is subject to limitations in accordance with the Russian Federation’s law on intellectual property.

In the event that a thesis is quoted or otherwise used, reference to the author’s name and the source of quotation is required.

Search all student theses