• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site

Student
Title
Supervisor
Faculty
Educational Programme
Final Grade
Year of Graduation
Roman Aleksandrov
Study of DAG Scheduling Algorithms in Distributed Systems using Simulation
Data Science
(Master’s programme)
2018
The paper studies the performance of algorithms for scheduling of DAG applications in heterogeneous distributed computing systems. The comparison of algorithms is performed on the base of discrete-event simulation in the context of exact and inaccurate assessments of the time of tasks for various application cases and system configurations. The developed simulation framework based on SimGrid toolkit provides the necessary tools for implementation of scheduling algorithms, generation of synthetic systems and applications, execution of simulation experiments and analysis of results. This allowed to perform a large number of experiments in a reasonable amount of time and to ensure reproducible results. Moreover, in our paper there is a comparison between state-of-the-art dynamic and static algorithms and new dynamic algorithm which was designed using ideas from advanced static algorithm DLS.

Student Theses at HSE must be completed in accordance with the University Rules and regulations specified by each educational programme.

Summaries of all theses must be published and made freely available on the HSE website.

The full text of a thesis can be published in open access on the HSE website only if the authoring student (copyright holder) agrees, or, if the thesis was written by a team of students, if all the co-authors (copyright holders) agree. After a thesis is published on the HSE website, it obtains the status of an online publication.

Student theses are objects of copyright and their use is subject to limitations in accordance with the Russian Federation’s law on intellectual property.

In the event that a thesis is quoted or otherwise used, reference to the author’s name and the source of quotation is required.

Search all student theses