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American Gothic and Psychologism: the Image of the House in Shirley Jackson's Prose

Student: Mariia Shevneva

Supervisor: Alexandra Bazhenova-Sorokina

Faculty: Faculty of Humanities

Educational Programme: Philology (Bachelor)

Final Grade: 8

Year of Graduation: 2020

The Haunting of Hill House is a gothic novel written by Shirley Jackson and is considered to be an exemplary ghost story widely acclaimed for relying heavily on the character’s psyche to create an atmosphere of suspense and terror. Because of its popularity, it is usually discussed separately from Jackson’s other novels but the image of the house and its psychological connection to its inhabitants is one of the main themes in her work. It is most prominent in Jackson’s other novel We Have Always Lived in a Castle so it is possible to analyze the correlation and evolution of the techniques she uses to depict the effects that the invasion and corruption of a safe space like home has on the mental state of the characters.

Full text (added May 31, 2020)

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