• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site
For visually-impairedUser profile (HSE staff only)SearchMenu

Anti-Corruption Policies in Covid-19 Preparedness and Response in Nigeria and South Africa

Student: Olatunji joshua Bamgbose

Supervisor: Sergey Parkhomenko

Faculty: Faculty of Social Sciences

Educational Programme: Political Analysis and Public Policy (Master)

Year of Graduation: 2021

The impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic outside of obvious physical and health consequences has been gathering a lot of attention in the scholarship. One of such areas that have been argued to have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic is in the area of public administration and policy since the pandemic presents risks that exacerbate the problem of corruption. While renowned international organizations like the UNODC have recommended anti-corruption strategies to tackle COVID-19 related corruption, it has been argued that some of those strategies cannot be adopted by some developing countries due to institutional inadequacies and lack of infrastructures required for their adoption. Hence, developing countries must nevertheless address corruption concerns during the COVID-19 pandemic, leading them to develop anti-corruption frameworks, suitable for adoption within their given countries taking into consideration socio-economic and political factors. This paper analyzes corruption and anti-corruption policy responses to COVID-19 related corruption in Nigeria and South Africa by mainly examining expert opinions gathered from primarily conducted interviews and taking into consideration evidence from secondary data like journals, news reports, and previous studies. We find that corruption was rampant in both South Africa and Nigeria during the COVID-19 pandemic which significantly affected their preparedness and response to the pandemic. Corrupt cases were particularly connected to public procurement of supplies and the distribution of social relief packages. We also find that while South-Africa was more pro-active in its anti-corruption policy responses, Nigeria was more passive. Furthermore, we find that civil-society and the media in South Africa played a more significant role that led to the detection and exposure of corruption compared to Nigeria. Keywords: Corruption, COVID-19 pandemic, Anti-corruption policy, Nigeria, South Africa

Student Theses at HSE must be completed in accordance with the University Rules and regulations specified by each educational programme.

Summaries of all theses must be published and made freely available on the HSE website.

The full text of a thesis can be published in open access on the HSE website only if the authoring student (copyright holder) agrees, or, if the thesis was written by a team of students, if all the co-authors (copyright holders) agree. After a thesis is published on the HSE website, it obtains the status of an online publication.

Student theses are objects of copyright and their use is subject to limitations in accordance with the Russian Federation’s law on intellectual property.

In the event that a thesis is quoted or otherwise used, reference to the author’s name and the source of quotation is required.

Search all student theses