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AUD students took a second place in a contest created by Volvo Buses and Sweco Architects dedicated to the urban future mobility

The project of Advanced Urban Design students, a joint programme by HSE Graduate School of Urbanism and Strelka Institute received the title of ‘most innovative’ and snagged second place in the international competition

If a time machine could take you to a bustling city in the year 2030, what would you see there? More specifically, what would the mobility situation be like? Would buses fly through the sky? Would they drive through shopping malls, dropping you off at your favorite stores?

These were the exact questions that two masters students from the Advanced Urban Design program – a joint project of Strelka Institute and the HSE Graduate School of Urbanism – asked themselves when they decided to take part in a contest created by Volvo Buses and Sweco Architects.

Basically architects Oskar Simann and Daniel Roche look at transportation not as a way of getting from A to B, but to actually save time or to be more productive with time. Day to day people just sit and wait, but they could actually be productive and have the first half hour of work on their way from their home into the city. That’s where idea of Volvo Cowork came from. At this point bus stops should be office hubs with all the necessary conditions suitable for work and even business meetings.

The contest was created by Volvo Buses and Sweco Architects. The competition asked architecture students to design the future of mobility in urban areas, specifically focusing on the role of Volvo’s electric buses. With a new vision and a whole lot of creativity, the two students received the title of ‘most innovative’ among all the entries, and snagged second place in the overall competition.

It wasn’t about delivering something ‘shiny’ or ‘spectacular,’ according to Roche, even if that’s what the competition’s judges wanted to see. ‘We’re more interested in working with systems that actually work as networks, that actually improve people’s lives,’ he said.

Although the students chose to focus on Gothenburg for their concept, Simann believes the method could also be implemented in other European cities of a similar size.

Read more about the Volvo Cowork project in Strelka Magazine.