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Regular version of the site

LCSR seminar on 'Individual Locus of Control and Innovativeness'

Event ended

Ronald F. Inglehart Laboratory for Comparative Social Research (LCSR) is holding the next regular seminar on Thursday, May, 20 at 16.30 (GMT+3).

A link to zoom-session is available upon request (lcsr.event@hse.ru)

Working language is English.

The seminar’s topic: Individual locus of control and innovativeness

Speakers: Maria Kravtsova (LCSR), Irina Levina (ICSID)

Abstract: Is higher locus of control – the extent to which individuals believe they control their lives and environment – always good for economic outcomes? In this paper, we explore the effect of individual locus of control on innovativeness as measured by performing creative tasks at work and ability to behave not as others expect from you. 

While the literature suggests that higher locus of control is associated with better economic outcomes, in this paper we assume that the relation between locus of control and innovativeness might be non-linear: excessive locus of control might prevent innovations. Individuals with too high levels of locus of control tend to withdraw from risky non-traditional behavior because in case of failure they would have no chance to shift blame on somebody else. Therefore, exploring new solutions might be emotionally very costly for people with high locus of control.

Next, we argue that in weak institutional environment these “side effects” of excessive locus of control are more pronounced. By underdeveloped institutions with the high level of uncertainty personal effort does not always result in positive outcome for uncontrollable reasons. Therefore, risky innovative behavior becomes even more costly for those individuals who take responsibility for their failures.

We test our hypotheses using 5-th and 6-th waves of the World Values survey. Institutional quality is proxied by the Rule of Law Index from the Worldwide Governmental Indicators provided by the World Bank. Our preliminary results suggest, that both hypotheses get empirical support: a) the relationship between individual locus of control and innovativeness has an inverted U-shaped form; b) the threshold value of locus of control after which individuals start reverting back to routine tasks at work and traditional behavior is lower in countries with weaker institutions.

 

If you have any questions about the seminar please contact LCSR manager - Anastasiya Ionova (aionova@hse.ru