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Regular version of the site

Library Night at HSE: Shakespeare, Museums and Quests

Almost 40 teams took part in the ‘Through the pages of Basmania’ quest, organized by the Higher School of Economics as part of an annual citywide event, Library Night. Event participants also staged passages from Romeo and Juliet and attended lectures about theatre at HSE library.

How are libraries and theatre connected? What do finance and religious education have in common? Where was the first Moscow public library opened? These were some of the questions participants of the historical quest ‘Through the pages of Basmania’ had to answer. The event was organised by HSE in cooperation with Basmanny district museum ‘Basmania’ and Moscow central libraries.

‘Through the pages of Basmania’
39

teams

1 – 5

people per team

5

best teams received gifts from HSE

57

minutes was the best team time (the participants travelled the route by bicycle)

> 3

hours it takes to walk the longest quest route by foot

Yulia Solovyova, Quest participant ‘Everything made sense, and I really liked it’

— Quest tasks always fall into one of two extremes: it’s either something super interesting but completely impossible to solve with no hint to start with, or it’s something too simple, and therefore unexciting. In this quest everything turned out to be great.

The quest, which was open to anyone interested in participating, started at 20 Myasnitskaya ulitsa and ended at 3 Krivokolenny pereulok.

The landmarks of the route included:

 The Russian State Public Historical Library;

 The House of the Russian poet Osip Mandelstam;

 Milutinsky Park;

 Vasily Zhukovsky Library;

 Fyodor Dostoevsky Library.

Another quest was held in the HSE library on Staraya Basmannaya and was dedicated to theatre and William Shakespeare. The participants attended an interactive lecture about theatre, a master class on public speaking and staged a passage from the tragedy Romeo and Juliet.

Library Night is an annual Russia-wide event dedicated to books and reading. This year it was held for the seventh time. On the holiday, Moscow libraries, bookstores, museums and cultural centres are open to visitors until late night, and sometimes all night. Those who like reading attend lectures, master classes, and take part in flash mobs and competitions.

See also:

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Exploring Global Politics, Culture, Art and Propaganda in the Social Media Age

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Post-Doctoral Fellow Discusses Research on Soviet-Era Citizenship and Language Policy

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LSE and HSE University – St Petersburg Support Russian Historians

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Researching Modern Music

Alexandra Kolesnik, Junior Research Fellow and Senior Lecturer at HSE’s Poletayev Institute for Theoretical and Historical Studies in the Humanities recently completed her post graduate studies in History and successfully defended her PhD thesis entitled ‘Historical representations in British popular musical culture of the 1960-1980s’. Here, Alexandra talks about her research into modern pop-culture.

Post-Doc Fellow from USA Studies Russian and Soviet Film and Photography

Jessica Werneke, who completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Iowa and her PhD at the University of Texas at Austin, joined the International Centre for the History and Sociology of World War II and its Consequences as a Research Fellow in 2016. Originally from Chicago, Illinois, she has spent a considerable amount of time living internationally – in both the UK and Latvia – and following her post-doc plans to start a new position as a Newton International Fellow of the British Academy at Loughborough University, where she will continue her research on Soviet photography clubs and amateur photographers in the RSFSR and the Baltic Republics.

The Soviet Film Revolution

The October Revolution created a new cinema. At first, 'the most important of all arts' struggled to keep up with social transformations and was not yet used as a weapon in the fight for a communist culture. But the mid-1920s, an innovative, cutting-edge film industry had emerged from sources such as theatre, street performance, posters, poetry and circus shows. This industry was able to do what the politicians had failed to achieve, namely trigger a world revolution.

Translation Studies Expert Speaks at School of Philology

On September 26 and 27, the HSE School of Philology hosted Professor Brian Baer of Kent University (Ohio, USA) for a lecture entitled ‘The Translator’s Biography in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia: Art, Politics, Identity’, followed by a workshop on ‘Teaching Translation Studies’. Following his lecture and workshop, Professor Baer spoke with the HSE News Service about his career as a translator, the role of the translator in society and his recommendations for international readers looking for exposure to Russian literature.