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HSE Researchers to Create a Mathematical Model of the Brain

The HSE Centre for Cognition and Decision Making together with a group of other Russian research centres is about to begin work on creating a mathematical model of the human brain. With its help scientists will be able to study the processes which take place in the brain and brain disease. It could be used for medical purposes in the future.   

In October this year the HSE Centre for Cognition and Decision Making (CCDM) with the Lobachevsky University, RAS Institute of Laser and Information Technologies and other Russian research centres won a federal competition to work on applied research in neurotechnology.

‘The human brain is a kind of bio-computer but we know very little about most of its processes,’ explains Boris Gutkin, Head of the working group on Neuromodeling at CCDM HSE. ‘Our aim is to understand the principles of information processing and changes in the brain. We will make a model of how signals are processed in brain cells, or neurons. Once we have studied the processes on an experimental level we plan to create a general mathematical model of the brain with our colleagues. We’ll use it to study different brain diseases and in particular Alzheimer’s, epilepsy and propose ways to  treat them.’ 

Three years have been timetabled for the theoretical part of the project. After that, pre-clinical trials will begin. It is hoped that in the future the model will be used in medicine.

The Centre for Cognition and Decision Making was established at the HSE Department of Psychology in 2014 and is currently the only centre in Russia specialising in the neurobiological mechanisms of decision making. Its purpose is to develop cognitive science in Russia. The centre works with the most up to date technology in neuroimaging and studying brain function. Research results have already been applied in engineering, medicine, economics, psychology, mathematics and other areas connected to neurobiology.

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