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Regular version of the site

Culture & History


Contemporary Russian Visual Culture (2 ECTS credits, 16 academic hours, HSE Moscow)  
Dates: August, 13 - 19

 

In this course you analyze contemporary Russian culture from the perspective of social visual icons, the role they play, and iconic consciousness they form.  The course is offered by the School of Cultural Studies of our partner university Higher School of Economics in Moscow and will take place in Moscow itself. You will learn to identify the typical aspects of the Russian visual culture. You will study the kind of icons that dominate the city and which social meanings they represent. Central is the power of images and their function as social fixers (key elements in the process of collective identity formation). You will discover the great importance of this phenomenon in cultural studies.

Media Culture and Society (2 ECTS credits, 16 academic hours, HSE Moscow) 
Dates: August, 06 - 11

The main goal of this course is to provide a general theoretical understanding on the role of the media and culture in social development. Such an understanding will enrich the general set of methods that can be used to study a contemporary media system and its implication for society. Such methods are generally based on social science methodology, and cover political science, social psychology, sociology, cultural studies, political economy and regional studies. A second goal is to provide some basic knowledge of Russia’s media, as the main examples used in this course are based on a deep analysis of the Russian media system and Russian society, public sphere, regional aspects, etc. 

A Glimpse of Russian History (3 ECTS credits, 24 academic hours, HSE Moscow)
Dates: June, 25 - July, 07

This course introduces students to the social, cultural, and political history of Russia from the Muscovite Tsardom in the sixteenth century to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. It focuses on the vital issues of Russian history, including, but not limited to: the formation of Moscow state in the early modern period, Peter the Great’s “revolution from above” in 1700—1725 and its cost, causes and consequences of Russia’s enormous territorial growth and its multiethnic composition in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, World War I and the fall of the Russian Empire in 1917, Stalin’s repressive regime, Soviet nations in World War II, Perestroika and the collapse of the Soviet Empire. Within these issues, we will also explore how history is used by politicians and other public figures in contemporary Russia, how it shapes popular myths and stereotypes about the country and its people, and how it provokes heated disputes among different social, ethnic, and religious groups. 

Intercultural Communication (2 ECTS credits, 16 academic hours, HSE Nizhny Novgorod)
Dates: July, 23 - 28

Marina Vladimirovna Tsvetkova
Dean, Professor:HSE Campus in Nizhny Novgorod / Faculty of Humanities (Nizhny Novgorod)
 


The course will be aimed at the development of cross-cultural awareness in interpersonal and professional communications and encompasses a theoretical and a practical part.
The theoretical part will be based on major theories and approaches in intercultural communication and cover not only American and European theories but also give a Russian perspective.
The practical part of the course will be incorporated into lectures and focus on case discussions and cross-cultural problems solving, which acquires an additional acuteness in the multicultural context of the programme. One of the major accents will be put on cultural peculiarities of Russia and the enigma of the Russian soul.The uniqueness of the course is in the combination of traditional and novel approaches, one of which was introduced by the scholars of Nizhny Novgorod school of intercultural communication.

 

Russia’s Institutional History (2 ECTS credits, 16 academic hours, HSE St. Petersburg)
Dates: July, 23 - 28 

 



This interdisciplinary course is designed to provide students with the necessary theoretical and empirical background for the study of Russian institutional history.  It will cover a broad set of issues, including concept of modernity and discussion on the alternative forms of modernization, structure of the Russian “dual” state and society, Russian totalitarianism, and notion of Russia as an anti-modern society.  The course’ ultimate ambition is to suggest an explanatory framework capable of capturing nature and peculiarities of the Russian societal evolution in the modern era.



* Please note, all dates TBC