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Regular version of the site

Saint Petersburg

Dates: July, 22 - 28

5 Reasons to pick St.Petersburg as HSE Summer University Destination:

1.     St. Petersburg is a cosmopolitan city and a real Russian 'melting pot' where you can meet people from all over Russia as well as from across the globe.

2.     With its stunning canals and ornate bridges, the historic centre of the city of St. Petersburg, known as the 'Venice of the North', was designated a world heritage site in 1991. It is a place not to be missed – it is in the top 20 ‘must visits’ according to Tripadvisor.

3.     HSE is one of the leading Russian universities and the St. Petersburg campus provides the perfect study destination for all students who wish to study in a dynamic, international environment. 

4.     Study in St. Petersburg and you will have the means to understand one of the major European classical literatures: Dostoyevsky, Gogol, Pushkin and many others were inspired by the beauty of this city. 

5.     You will learn specific local words and phrases that have been in use since the 18th century and remain part and parcel of the unique St. Petersburg identity. Your buddies will always ready to help you with learning some Russian! 

HSE Saint Petersburg offers 10 undergraduate and 11 graduate programmes. Master's programme in Applied and Interdisciplinary History: Usable Pasts is taught in English. Master's programme in Finance is a double-degree programme with University College London. 

Please find more summer schools at HSE Saint Petersburg campus here 




Critical Perspectives on International Business (2 ECTS credits, 16 academic hours)

 


This course provides the theoretical framework and practical experience of international business in unpredictable and rapidly changing environment. This is a "big picture" course about different aspects in international business: main global trends, influencing strategies of international companies, competitiveness and globalization, the organizational response to environmental changes. A key aspect during the course is to have an opportunity to observe and assess the international companies’ performance with the emphasis on global economic situation. The course includes a traditional lecture-segment and a student activity-segment with the core focus on real life situations. The case studies and assignments will be used to illustrate key points of international business theory and the challenges facing organisations in an international context.

Contemporary Russian Politics (2 ECTS credits, 16 academic hours)

Ivan Grigoriev

Senior Lecturer:HSE Campus in St. Petersburg / Saint-Petersburg School of Social Sciences and Area Studies / Department of Political Science

 

 This is a broad introductory course to Russian politics designed to give you a good general understanding of how Russia really works. The questions we will deal with are: Why do Russians support autocracy, or do they? Is it good Russia is a presidential republic? What happened to Russian federalism? What about its opposition? Who were those people in the streets in 2011-2012: what did they want, where did they go? Why does Russia sometimes support the bad guys internationally? Some practical issues we will discuss are: why do they turn the hot water off at summer? Are oligarchs still politically mighty? How much corruption is there and is it bad for development? The course kicks off from, and ultimately returns to the question of how Russian politics interacts with Russian society and economy, and by its end students will get a firm grasp of how this triangle works. To achieve that, the course offers a reasonably vast reading of scholarly articles seasoned with ongoing political commentary and media reports.

History of the Arctic:  science, politics, cultural and natural heritage (2 ECTS credits, 16 academic hours) 

 

This course focuses on the environmental, political and cultural history of the Circumpolar North. It introduces a wide interdisciplinary view on diverse human experiences in the Arctic, problems of regional history and history of its resource management, the importance of history for the current understanding of economic, social and environmental problems of the Arctic. Key historical trends will be examined to demonstrate how the North was incorporated into nation-states that govern the circumpolar regions of the world. The course will locate the development of the Arctic in larger historical trends of colonial and post-colonial studies, history of science and exploration, technology and environment, international efforts in region-building in the Arctic and national concerns of different states on security, resources and human-being in the North. It will focus on both human and non-human connections in the history of the area, including the influence of climate.I