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Classical Sociological Theory

2021/2022
Учебный год
ENG
Обучение ведется на английском языке
4
Кредиты
Статус:
Курс по выбору
Когда читается:
2-й курс, 1 модуль

Преподаватель

Course Syllabus

Abstract

This course will offer the participants an introduction into the most important classical sociological readings between the 18th and 20th century. Highly influential social science scholars, such as Karl Marx, Max Weber and Emile Durkheim, will be discussed during 8 sessions. Combined with small tests, based on the video’s and recommended readings, the participants will be encouraged to dive deeply into the complex texts and get familiar with classical sociological concepts that are still very relevant today. The course is a Massive Open Online Course delivered at Coursera platform ( online courses and take an oral examination at HSE for completing the course. The examination is taken after completion of the course during examination week. The full syllabus is published at the course websites. (https://www.coursera.org/learn/classical-sociological-theory). The course doesn’t require special previous knowledge and competences. Only for students of Comparative Social Research programme
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • Provide students the classical sociological concepts that are still very relevant today
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • to explain the historical roots of sociology
  • get familiar with the author of the word “sociology”, August Comte
  • to get familiar with Adam Smith's theory shines light on the consequences of industrialization
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Week 1: Classical Sociological Theory - An Introduction
    In this session the field of classical sociological theory will be introduced. It explains the historical roots of sociology. It shows you why classical sociological theories are still important in modern societies and it explains the Aims and Claims of this Course.
  • Week 2: Bernard Mandeville (1670-1733) and Adam Smith (1723-1790)
    This session explains the work of Adam Smith. It shows you how a poem written by Bernard Mandeville inspired Adam Smith. Adam Smith's theory shines light on the consequences of industrialization. You will learn what the consequences are of the Division of Labour.
  • Week 3: Auguste Comte (1798-1857)
    This session will cover the author of the word “sociology”, August Comte. He often engaged in theorizing the social world in order to attempt to discover invariant laws. Terms like “positivism”, “the law of the three stages” and “Functionalism” are prominent topics in this session. Comte believed that positivism could both advance science (theory) and change the ways people live their lives (practice).
  • Week 4: Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-1859)
    Tocqueville’s works shaped 19th-century discussions of liberalism and equality, and were rediscovered in the 20th century as sociologists debated the causes and cures of tyranny and revolutions. His famous work “Democracy in America” remains widely read and even more widely quoted. This session will cover Tocqueville’s most important ideas.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • Partially blocks (final) grade/grade calculation After attending the MOOC it is required to present the final results (certificate/another document).
  • non-blocking Oral exam
  • Partially blocks (final) grade/grade calculation After attending the MOOC it is required to present the final results (certificate/another document).
  • non-blocking Oral exam
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (1 module)
    After attending the MOOC it is required to present the final results (certificate or another document - C). The document has to be submitted to the study office immediately after completion of the course. After successful completion of the course an examination is undertaken. Prerequisite for attending the examination is submission of the certificate to the study office. The examination grade (E) is the final grade for the course. Final control: oral group exam. The overall course grade (G) (10-point scale) is calculated as a sum of G = C*0.7+ E*0.3
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Berberoglu, B. (2017). Social Theory : Classical and Contemporary – A Critical Perspective. New York: Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1449724
  • Classical sociological theory, Calhoun, C., 2002
  • Swedberg, R. (2014). The Art of Social Theory. [N.p.]: Princeton University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=760411

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Klaus Weber, & Brayden King. (2013). Oxford Handbook of Sociology, Social Theory and Organization Studies. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.A3D65461
  • Schroeder, R. (2018). Social Theory After the Internet : Media, Technology, and Globalization. London: UCL Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1691623