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Future Transport Systems

2019/2020
Учебный год
ENG
Обучение ведется на английском языке
4
Кредиты
Статус:
Курс по выбору
Когда читается:
2-й курс, 1 семестр

Преподаватель


Сыромятников Александр Евгеньевич

Course Syllabus

Abstract

Students will start to understand how economies relied on travel correspondences to function and at what volume will continue to rely on physical correspondence for an economic transaction to function. The course heavily conveys packed-up knowledge that students of the program lack to cover their gaps needed to go further with this course (see below). All in all, the course aims to convey the basic piece of knowledge that ‘transport studies’ is about applying almost every science to urban management.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • To give students general and in-depth understanding of how travel has been defining cities, their spatial organisations, their urban economies, their outlooks, attitudes and thinking frameworks of their citizens
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Embed scientific framework of transport studies into student’s mind-maps opposed to ‘general common sense’ framework
  • Give solid understanding of how cities spatially, technologically, and economically function today;
  • Illustrate convincingly what led to this spatial, technological, and economic status quos
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Legacy Background of Future Cities: How It All Ended Up Like This
    First Topic serves not as an introduction, but as a major fundamental piece of knowledge of the course—it describes the legacy we as planners will have to carry to the future for at least 5—7 decades and some of them for 10—25 decades. The whole topic is centered around the timeline: pre-1654 (human and horse-powered traction), 1654 (Pascal’s Paris principles for public transit), 1790 (steam traction), 1820’s (first civil railed-ways and transport tunnels), 1860’s (digging underground), 1880’s (electric traction), 1890’s—1901 (digging electric traction underground) 1900’s (first hybrids, flying car concept, Wright Brothers and flying), 1910’s (first combustion traction), after-1913 (Ford-T), 1920’s (first combustion buses), 1930’s (FDR’s New Deal), 1950’s (automobile is the king), 1960’s (great rail destruction, ICAO+IATA regulations, great air travel revolution), 1970’s (car-oriented-development and urban planning, Detroit-Robocop anti-utopia), 1980’s (destroying public transit over-ground, first automated driving implementations), 1990’s (TOD appears, reinvented transit), 2000’s (dotcom economy for transit, inter-net and intra-net in transit, pre-requisites for xAAS, fully automated transit implemented), 2010’s (XaaS and MaaS arrival, digitalisations, Google and Uber, ITS), 2020’s (MaaS and XaaS in place, personal transit). Every invented and commercialized concept is shown diachronically—not as if it just appeared—with logic, administrative and capital ‘wars,’ and commetcial-business-aspect of them. Every concept is chained to the legacy-framework and legacy-implications we as planners have to account for in 2010’s, 2020’s and 2050’s. Prognosis and rationale for them are given on when and why this legacy will vanish.
  • Fundamentals of Eternal Urban Knowledge: Economics, Transport Market Organisation, Institutional Economics, Geography, Traction and Vehicle Engineering, Civil Construction, Transport Construction, Transport Legislation
    Topic covers principal geographical, sociological, economical, physical, engineering, and legal principles we have up to 2020. The aspect is how quickly they will or will not change up to 2050 based on their kinetics in the course of the last 200 years. Mapping and geography. Transport and mobility as an application of every science to the map. Bi- and tri-sector economics, market powers, market-driven organisation of transport reality, Christaller’s central place theory and market(place) city purpose, travel for economic transactions. Mobility as the major driver of everything. Means of communication for economic transactions: snail-mail, wired communication, online, clearing in finance, video-conferencing etc. Administrative bargain, electoral economics applied to travel, mobility, and transport infrastructure. Urban utopias failed to lack of understanding of institutional economics, politics, theory of games, and administrative bargain. Legal impedance: how norms are and were created with time. What is up to 2020 with them? Regional divides. Grindering norms in reality. Government as an enemy. Human behaviour and market de-facto and de-jure. Infrastructural background. Constructions, Boston’s Big Dig. Financing and capital sourcing: concessions, public procurements, private-public-partnerships, small government concept and inefficiencies, venture and classic loan capital. Arrival of digitalization. XaaS+MaaS+IoT. Big data: data custody, data stewardship, data processing, data outcomes. Protocols and communication framework. Ecosystems available and in the pipe-line. Master-planning and ‘architectural’ planning in transport and mobility. Hausseman-Posohin-Moses in Paris, Moscow and New York.
  • Major State of Affairs and Legacy in Rail, Aero, and Road Transport
    Topic concentrates on the legacy planners will have to account for in the next 100 years, that arose as deep as 1654, Roman Empire, but in major – since Napoleonic transformations of urban, and mobility agenda. By reviewing the current organisation, legal framework, engineering and technological state of affairs in major transport industries—air, intra and inter-city transit, automotive industry, schematic designs and construction, students arrive to conclusion about what they will have to carry into their planning. ‘Air’ chunk covers traffic control, different markets (handling, airport services, applied commercial estate, applied retail and sales, fuel, catering, fleet management, airline business, revenue management in airline passenger shift, fleet leasing, fleet production) and organising air space for travel. ‘Rail’ chunk is a principal determinator of planning legacy and of high-commercial-speeds modes of transport principles of creation of transport systems covers the electric traction, accelerations and de-accelerations, principles of engineering the high-speed rolling stock, rails and ROWs of heavy- and light-rails. ‘Road’ chunk covers automobilisation trends since 1890’s up to 2010’s, Ford-T, FDR’s New Deal and Interstate Systems, rubber wheels on a paved road, different traction methods of these carriages, Intellectual Transport Systems (ITS) for paved roads, taxation and externalities internalisation in transport, taxation and fee collection (esp. tolled roads), pay-as-you-go and performance-related-pay (PRP) in transport and car ownership.
  • Creating the Transport Solution (1): Modelling the Transport Line with Old-School and Future Transport Modes
    Topic gives structure to transport supply available. Students learn how to give supply with available technological and engineering resources in 2010’s and in the future decade. ‘Modes’ of transport are described in terms of resources available to satisfy the transport demand. Set geography is given in class: teacher guides students to create a 2010 and 2010+ transport solution and to embed into an existing system and a projected system in the next 20—50 years. Students learn how to pick traction, Right-of-Ways, rolling stock, fueling, capacities, comfort parametres, stations, network.
  • Creating the Transport Solution (2): Modelling Financial Model of the Operator Company of the Transport Line
    Forming operation and capital expenditure. Fixed and variable costs. Revenue collection, fee collection and administration. The mechanics behind linear construction, rolling stock design, production, and procurement. The mechanics behind staffing, autopiloting, wages, taxation, capital movement in transport, servicing, fueling, physical and commercial amortisations. Accounting for in accountantcy and finance. Balancing opex-capex and its diachronically planning. Financial modelling, physical implementation, and legal implementation. Mechanics of drawn capital usage.
  • Implementing Transport Solutions: how future will arrive, what impedes it and what nourishes
    Business-to-government divide: working in the framework. Understanding drivers and obstacles of progress. Drawing capital, finding administrative resources Real-life cases of change management in transport and in public transit. Institutional and legal impedance. Analysing future and new solutions with mentioned methods and paradigms. Drawing estimations on time resources in implementation.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Classwork
  • non-blocking Final written test
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (1 semester)
    0.4 * Classwork + 0.6 * Final written test
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Blinkin, M., & Koncheva, E. (2016). Transport Systems of Russian Cities : Ongoing Transformations. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1353847
  • Cole, S. (2005). Applied Transport Economics : Policy Management and Decision Making. London: Kogan Page. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=845655
  • Jacobs, J. (1992). The Death and Life of Great American Cities. New York: Vintage. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1280725
  • Small, K. A., & Verhoef, E. T. (2007). The Economics of Urban Transportation. London: Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=208963

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Boyer, K. D. (2005). Principles of Transport Economics. Transportation Journal (American Society of Transportation & Logistics Inc), 44(4), 73. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=f5h&AN=18789624
  • Kenneth Button. (1993). Transport Economics. Edward Elgar Publishing. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsrep&AN=edsrep.b.elg.eebook.56
  • The Economics of Urban Transportation. (2007). Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsnar&AN=edsnar.oai.research.vu.nl.publications.12a4ad0e.27f7.4ca6.9ac1.71acb04f2409