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Urban Histories

2019/2020
Учебный год
ENG
Обучение ведется на английском языке
4
Кредиты
Статус:
Курс обязательный
Когда читается:
1-й курс, 2 семестр

Преподаватель


Острогорский Александр Юрьевич

Course Syllabus

Abstract

Through comprehensive exploration of the most ambitious urban visioning coming from various epochs students learn to gather and analyse information and knowledge related to both urban development theories and urban realities. Students are encouraged to read texts and use audiovisual material to develop their understanding of the cases, and represent it to the group in ways that evoke discussions and lead to the understanding of the urbanism as creative and critical practices. By carrying out such analysis students will be able to produce their own critical texts on the urban future by the end of the course.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • - to enhance analytical and critical thinking on the subject of urban planning and history; - to outline key periods in the urban history through various texts and audiovisual materials; - to inform students about historic visions of the urban future which were never realized but impacted the urban culture; - to train students in creating and defending scenarios of urban future based on the current knowledge of technological progress and social changes; - to develop students’ skills in debating on the subjects of urban history and the future of cities.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • - to enhance analytical and critical thinking on the subject of urban planning and history; - to outline key periods in the urban history through various texts and audiovisual materials; - to inform students about historic visions of the urban future which were never realized but impacted the urban culture;
  • - to train students in creating and defending scenarios of urban future based on the current knowledge of technological progress and social changes; - to develop students’ skills in debating on the subjects of urban history and the future of cities.
  • - to train students in creating and defending scenarios of urban future based on the current knowledge of technological progress and social changes;
  • - to develop students’ skills in debating on the subjects of urban history and the future of cities.
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Introduction to radical thinking
    Throughout the course we will deal with the ideas of utopian futures for cities and radical changes in ways cities are built and run. In the end you will have to produce a radical proposal of your own. So we start with a general question: what is radical thinking, are utopias good for anything, and how could we learn from ideas of the past that were not (could not be, were never intended to be) realised. By the end of these 2 or 3 weeks you will have to produce a short (500 words) essay, a statement, summarising the discussions and formulating your understanding of what is the role of utopias for the history of urbanism and if the time for utopias has past.
  • Case-study as a method
    Almost half of the course we will devote to the study of cases, each of them representing one or more urban utopian, radical ideas. Most of them are familiar to you, some you have already met through the previous course, others become a discovery of completely new names and ideas. But before we get down to it, we need to figure out what exactly and exactly how we want to know. It is not so easy to study real situations that we can meet in cities. Even more difficult it will be with fictitious, fantastic situations. We will begin with a small exercise: imagine that in the novel Italo Calvino “Invisible City” are described not fictitious, but real settlements. What questions could we have for them? To outline the range of possible issues, we will use a large study devoted to Moscow—“Archeology of the Periphery.”
  • Case-studies
    Each case is dedicated to one or more radical ideas. Our task will be to understand not only what the authors of these ideas suggested, but also their reasoning. Many ideas of the past do not seem interesting today. But this does not mean that we can not learn a certain way of argument, a certain strategy of critical thinking and use them today—in other circumstances, dealing with other issues. To understand this we need to understand: what urban problems worried the authors of these ideas, what intellectual tradition they belong to, what exactly was radical in their approach, how these ideas affected the theory and practice of urbanism. You will work on case studies in groups. Each group will have to collect materials about what the city or cities were like then, demonstrate it with the help of data and maps, reveal how cites could change if these ideas were realised, how they changed in reality. Each student will work on three cases through the course. Reading materials will be provided for each case as well as to be collected by students.
  • Individual projects
    At the end of the course, each of you, based on the materials we study, will independently formulate a radical idea about the future of a particular city. We will begin by discussing the radical strategies, revealed by you in the process of case-studies. Then you will choose cities you want to work with. For all cities, we will collect the same set of materials, including historical information, data, maps, forecasts, political and urban ideas. You have to decide—for what problem you will be looking for a solution, what a radical strategy to use. Your argument will be presented in an essay form and a presentation on the last week of the course.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Homework 1
  • non-blocking Final Essay
  • non-blocking Homework 2
  • non-blocking Homework 3
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (2 semester)
    0.4 * Final Essay + 0.2 * Homework 1 + 0.2 * Homework 2 + 0.2 * Homework 3
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Calvino, I., & Weaver, W. (1974). Invisible Cities. Orlando: Mariner Books. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1872539
  • Morrison, T. (2015). Unbuilt Utopian Cities 1460 to 1900: Reconstructing Their Architecture and Political Philosophy. Surrey: Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1056155
  • Mumford, L. 1895-1990. (1922). The story of utopias / Lewis Mumford; with an introduction by Hendrik Willem van Loon. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.43F49C98
  • Pinder, D. (2002). In Defence of Utopian Urbanism: Imagining Cities After the “End of Utopia.” Geografiska Annaler Series B: Human Geography, 84(3/4), 229. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.0435-3684.2002.00126.x

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Rothstein, E., & Muschamp, H. (2003). Visions of Utopia. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=120951