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Legal Regulation in Urban Planning and Management

2020/2021
Учебный год
ENG
Обучение ведется на английском языке
6
Кредиты
Статус:
Курс обязательный
Когда читается:
1-й курс, 2 семестр

Преподаватель

Course Syllabus

Abstract

The course consists of two parts: (1) exercise of rights in urban space, (2) legal risk management. In the first part of the course, the students will learn the basics of legal and political theory: the purposes of law, the role of law in a state, the distribution of power between the state and the city. Further the course will address the exercise of key civil rights in urban environment: privacy, freedom of speech and information, freedom of assembly, the right to safe environment. In the second part of the course, the students will acquire the skills necessary to manage legal risks while implementing an urban project. The course will introduce all stages of risk management: assessment, analysis, management and monitoring. The students will be required to apply this methodology in their exam project. Ultimately, this course will enable students to critically analyse the role of law in how citizens exercise their rights. The course will also equip the students with practical skills to mitigate legal risks in their future work.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • To introduce the system of legal regulations by which a city is governed
  • To enable the students to identify and assess legal risks in developing urban projects
  • To enable students to critically analyse the role of law on a global scale and in everyday aspects of their work
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • To introduce the system of legal regulations by which a city is governed
  • Apply relevant regulatory requirements to the student’s professional context
  • To enable the students to identify and assess legal risks in developing urban projects; To enable students to critically analyse the role of law on a global scale and in everyday aspects of their work
  • Assess legal risk arising in the student’s future job; Discuss steps to mitigate identified legal risks in different situations
  • Discuss steps to mitigate identified legal risks in different situations; Explain key legal principles, rights and responsibilities; Debate risks and responsibilities across a range of legal case studies
  • Apply relevant regulatory requirements to the student’s professional context; Assess legal risk arising in the student’s future job
  • Discuss steps to mitigate identified legal risks in different situations; Explain key legal principles, rights and responsibilities
  • To enable students to critically analyse the role of law on a global scale and in everyday aspects of their work
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Introduction to the Course: Why law matters. How to think like a lawyer
    Introduces the various types of regulation of human conduct according to Lawrence Lessing: the law, social norms, the market, and architecture (technical infrastructure). Demonstrates the objectives of legal regulation by comparing the outcome of an ethical, efficient and legal solutions to the same problem. Formulates the course objectives and expectations from the course.
  • Law and the State
    Introduces the definitions of law and the functions law serves in society. Discusses the role of law within a state and key characteristics of a modern state. Introduces the three branches of government.
  • Law and the City
    Discusses the different levels at which urban development can be regulated. Demonstrates how the structure of the government impacts the legal regulation: centralised vs de-centralised (using the examples of London and Moscow).
  • Law and the Smart City
    Frames the concept of a ‘smart city’ in legal context. Demonstrates the importance of regulating big data for the purposes of city projects.
  • Privacy and Data Protection
    Presents the concepts of privacy and data protection and the difference between them. In continuation of the previous topic, looks at what threats come along with the benefits of Big Data, while focusing on the threats to privacy. Reviews the international legal framework for the protection of the right to privacy, and the exiting national and supra-national data protection legislation in: (i) European Union, (ii) USA, (iii) Russia. Introduces the debate between the ethics of privacy and the politics of security.
  • Legal Risk Management Process
    Teaches the student how to perform legal risk management: (i) risk identification, (ii) risk assessment, (iii) risk management, and (iv) monitoring. Most of the learning will be based on practical application of the legal risk management methodology and will include a field trip.
  • Intellectual Property
    Introduces the key concepts and regulation of Intellectual Property Law: the issues of ownership, protection of rights, licensing and liability. Covers the main spheres where the IP rights are involved in the course of urban development, including IP right to architectural and design objects, city plans, technology and software used in public spaces.
  • Urban Zoning and Planning
    Covers the topics related to land use regulation. Frames the discussion within regional context.
  • Urban Mobility and Walkability
    Discusses how law impacts urban mobility. Frames mobility as a democracy issue. Connects mobility with land use regulation.
  • Sustainability and Waste Management
    Discusses the way to regulate waste management with focus on urban solutions.
  • Global Approach to Legal Regulation of Urban Development
    Poses a question about the role of national legislative regimes in light of the rising power of major cities.
  • Prototyping an improvement for a Moscow district
    The completion of the Knowledge Assessment project is meant to demonstrate how well the students have mastered the skills and knowledge acquire through the course.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Home and in class assignments
  • non-blocking Exam Project
  • non-blocking Class attendance
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (2 semester)
    0.1 * Class attendance + 0.5 * Exam Project + 0.4 * Home and in class assignments
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Edward Glaeser. (2012). Viewpoint: Triumph of the City. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.A2D0F4E8
  • Frug, G. E. (1999). City Making : Building Communities Without Building Walls. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=74718
  • Frug, G. E. (2014). The Central-Local Relationship. Stanford Law & Policy Review, 25(1), 1–8. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=97301665
  • Gutschow, E. (2019). Big Data-driven Smart Cities: Computationally Networked Urbanism, Real-Time Decision-Making, and the Cognitive Internet of Things. Geopolitics, History & International Relations, 11(2), 48–54. https://doi.org/10.22381/GHIR11220197
  • Harris, P. (2007). An Introduction to Law (Vol. 7th ed). Cambridge: Cambridge eText. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=304550
  • Shuler, J. A. (2001). Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace (Book Review). Government Information Quarterly, 18(1), 64. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0740-624X(00)00068-X

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Bygrave, L. A. (2017). Data Protection by Design and by Default : Deciphering the EU’s Legislative Requirements. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.3DE9A496
  • Deibert, R. (2013). Black Code : Surveillance, Privacy, and the Dark Side of the Internet. Toronto: Signal. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=743006
  • Frug, G. E., & Barron, D. J. (2008). City Bound : How States Stifle Urban Innovation. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=671427