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Regular version of the site

Dear conference participants!

The preliminary programme is now available:   ESLP_2017_preliminary_programme


 

PROGRAM

 

Session 1: Sunday, 10 September

 

Auditorium

Armyanskiy per. 4

Time

Speaker

Title

9:00 – 9:30

Vasily Klucharev

WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION

9:30 – 10:30

Pia Knoeferle

What guides situating language processing?

10:30 – 11:00

COFFEE BREAK

11:00 – 11:30

Dato Abashidze,

Pia Knoeferle

Actor gaze and action mismatches during language processing

11:30 – 12:00

Olga Dragoy, Anna Chrabaszcz, Anna Laurinavichyute, Nina Ladinskaya, Valeria Tolkacheva, Andriy Myachykov

Oculomotor resonance during processing past and future tense

12:00 – 12:30

Katja Münster,

Pia Knoeferle

The effect of speaker facial expression and listener mimicry on emotional sentence processing

12:30 – 13:00

Julia Marina Kroeger, Katja Münster, Pia Knoeferle

Do Prosody and Case Marking influence Thematic Role Assignment in Ambiguous Action Scenes?

13:00 – 13:30

Elli Tourtouri, Francesca Delogu, Matthew Crocker

The interplay of specificity and referential entropy reduction in situated communication

13:30 – 14:30

LUNCH

14:30 – 15:30

Lawrence Barsalou

What does semantic tiling of the cortex tell us about semantics?

15:30 – 16:00

Rasha Hyder, Yury Shtyrov, Karen Østergaard, Andreas Højlund

Non-invasive task-free protocol for assessing multiple levels of linguistic information processing

16:00 – 16:30

Elena Kulkova, Yury Shtyrov, Matteo Feurra, Andriy Myachykov

Idiom sentence processing elicits larger excitation in M1, compared to metaphor sentence processing

16:30 – 17:00

Valeriia Perepelytsia

Language Networks on Molecular Level

17:00 – 17:30

COFFEE BREAK

17:30 – 18:00

Christoph Scheepers, Sophie Messner, Ben Dunn

The Crossword Effect: A retrieval advantage for words encoded in line with their spatial association

18:00 – 18:30

Pawel Sickinger

Exploring the conceptual basis of multilingual language processing

18:30 – 20:00

RECEPTION AND POSTER SESSION 1

Auditorium

 

 

 

Session 2: Monday, 11 September

 

Auditorium

Time

Speaker

Title

9:00 – 9:30

Maria Yudkevich

WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION

9:30 – 10:30

Luciano Fadiga

The syntactic brain

10:30 – 11:00

COFFEE BREAK

11:00 – 11:30

Hamutal Kreiner

Prosodic temporal patterns as an embodiment of syntax

11:30 – 12:00

Tatjana Nazir

Embodiment of Literature: EGG while listening to book excerpts distinguishes between fiction and documentation

12:00 – 12:30

Thomas Kluth, Michele Burigo, Holger Schultheis, Pia Knoeferle

Size Matters: Effects of Relative Distance on the Acceptability of Spatial Prepositions

12:30 – 13:00

Carol Martínez-Arboleda, William Correa-Rodriguez, Johan Grisales-Cardenas, Catalina Trujillo, Juan F Cardona, Fernando Marmolejo-Ramos

Body representation in Parkinson’s disease

13:00 – 13:30

Natalia Zaitseva, Dmitry Zaitsev

Language Acquisition, Simulation and Phenomenology

13:30 – 14:30

LUNCH

POSTER SESSION 2

Auditorium

14:30 – 15:30

Michael Arbib

Constructing a construction grammar adequate for modeling the language-ready brain

15:30 – 16:00

Natalie Kacinik

Large ants and small mansions: To what extent do perceptual manipulations affect word processing?

16:00 – 16:30

Marina Shkuropackaya

Secondary nomination in Mongolian and Russian language picture of the world (based on zoonyms)

16:30 – 17:00

Elena Nekrasova

 

«Modality in modality». Audiovisual perception of words with audiovisual semantics.

17:00 – 17:30

COFFEE BREAK

17:30 – 18:00

Claudia Mazzuca, Luisa Lugli, Roberto Nicoletti, Anna M. Borghi

Abstract, Emotional and Concrete Concepts and the activation of mouth-hand effectors

18:00 – 18:30

Ladislas Nalborczyk, Marcela Perrone-Bertolotti, Céline Baeyens, Romain Grandchamp, Elsa Spinelli, Ernst Koster, Hélène Lœvenbruck

Verbal rumination as simulated speech

18:30 – 20:00

DINNER AND BOAT TRIP

 

 

 

Session 3: Tuesday, 12 September

 

Auditorium

Armyanskiy per. 4

Time

Speaker

Title

10:00 – 11:00

Lera Boroditsky

How languages help us construct and construe events

10:30 – 11:00

COFFEE BREAK

11:00 – 11:30

Andrej Kibrik, Olga Fedorova, Alla Litvinenko, Julia Nikolaeva

An empirical study of multichannel communication

11:30 – 12:00

Bo Yao

"She sells seashells": Direct speech quotations promote tongue-twister effects in silent reading

12:00 – 12:30

Lawrence Taylor

Dissociation between action and motion verbs: Evidence from stroke

12:30 – 13:00

Markus Ostarek, Jeroen van Paridon, Samuel Evans, Falk Huettig

Conceptual processing of up/down words (cloud/grass) recruits cortical oculomotor areas

13:00 – 13:30

Gediminas Schüppenhauer, Katarzyna Stoltmann

Short-term memory processes of German sign language speakers

13:30 – 14:30

Vladimir Glebkin, Nikita Safronov, Varvara Sonina

Discourse acquisition by Russian preschool-aged children: The case of pear film retelling

14:30 – 15:00

CLOSING REMARKS

15:00 – 18:00

KREMLIN TOUR

 


 

Keynote talks.

 

"How languages help us construct and construe events"

Lera Boroditsky, PhD

Associate Professor of Cognitive Science

University of Califronia, San Diego, USA.
Lera Boroditsky

Abstract:

Languages differ in how they describe events. Further, within any given language, options for describing a particular physical event are often myriad. In this talk I will give some examples of how languages help us construct and construe physical reality, parceling up the stream of experience into units, assigning agents, endpoints, and adding information about intention and completion. These features of language guide how speakers of different languages attend to, remember and reason about events. I will also describe work with bilinguals, asking how influences from multiple languages mix in one mind. Do bilinguals perceive events with a cognitive "accent” inherited from the other languages they speak?

 


"The Syntactic Brain." 

Luciano Fadiga MD, PhD

Professor of Physiology

University of Ferrara and The Italian Institute of Technology, Italy

Luciano Fadiga

 Abstract:

"My contribution will focus on the discussion of new hypotheses about a possible sensorimotor origin of language. In fact, although ideas that language and action could share some common neural substrates have been formulated by many and for a long time, they are usually referring to the similarity between motor planning and syntactic linguistic structures. I believe instead, and in this sense I will present some recent empirical evidence, that the similarity should be sought in the hierarchical structure and in the generalization ability that characterize the structural/functional organization of the motor system. So no planning (software) but computational potentialities of a sensorimotor structure (hardware) that has undergone a developmental soaring because of the evolution of the new capacity (starting in primates and exploding in man) of directly controlling individual spinal motoneurons. This direct control frees, on one side, the brain from the rigidity of spinal and subcortical motor synergies but, on the other side, imposes an exponential increase  in computational complexity which could be recycled for cognitive purposes as well. It appears of particular interest in this regard the role of Broca's region, traditionally considered as the frontal center for  speech production, but more and more considered as a venue for common syntactic processing in both action and language domains."


 

"Constructing a Construction Grammar Adequate for Modeling the Language-Ready Brain"

Michael A. Arbib, PhD
Professor of Computer Science

University of Southern California, USA

Michael Arbib

Abstract:

"As part of a long-standing effort to understand the evolution of the language-ready brain (Arbib, 2016; Arbib & Rizzolatti, 1997), I have sought to better characterize what it is that evolved – namely, the brain mechanisms that support the use of language by modern humans. In particular, the aim is to understand the mechanisms linking perception, action and language. An entry point into the study of grammar seems needed for this purpose, and I have sought to bridge between brain theory (Arbib & Bonaiuto, 2016) and construction grammar (Croft, 2001; Goldberg, 2013) in this quest. Unfortunately, even computational construction grammars comes in diverse forms and so this raises the question: What can each version contribute to the eventual emergence of a Neural Construction Grammar (NCG) whose computations are linked to those for perception and action in a neurally plausible way to form an integrated model NCG++ of the larger system, and what gaps remain to be filled? This talk will report on the progress in performing this analysis with four colleagues who are experts in Dynamic Construction Grammar (DCG, Peter Ford Dominey), Embodied Construction Grammar (ECG, Nancy Chang), Fluid Construction Grammar (FCG, Michael Spranger) and Template Construction Grammar (TCG, Victor Barrès) with, as stated above, concern for how grammar links to interaction with the external world. A word of caution, though – although all humans rest their use of language on a brain within a human body, I think it is misleading to say that all language is embodied. Rather, the issue, I suggest, is to ask how evolution and embodiment provide an embodied core from which abstraction could emerge (Arbib, Gasser, & Barrès, 2014)."

References

Arbib, M. A. (2016). Towards a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology: Framing the Language-Ready Brain. Physics of Life Reviews, 16, 1-54.

Arbib, M. A., & Bonaiuto, J. J. (Eds.). (2016). From Neuron to Cognition via Computational Neuroscience. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Arbib, M. A., Gasser, B., & Barrès, V. (2014). Language is handy but is it embodied? Neuropsychologia, 55, 57-70.

Arbib, M. A., & Rizzolatti, G. (1997). Neural expectations: a possible evolutionary path from manual skills to language. Communication and Cognition, 29, 393-424.

Croft, W. (2001). Radical construction grammar: syntactic theory in typological perspective. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Goldberg, A. E. (2013). Constructionist Approaches to Language. In T. Hoffmann & G. Trousdale (Eds.), Handbook of Construction Grammar: Oxford University Press.


 

 

"What Does Semantic Tiling of the Cortex Tell Us About Semantics?" 

Lawrence W. Barsalou, PhD
Professor of Psychology

Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology

School of Psychology

University of Glasgow, UK

Lawerence Barsalou 

Abstract

"Recent use of voxel-wise modeling in cognitive neuroscience suggests that semantic maps tile the cortex. Although this impressive research establishes distributed cortical areas active during the conceptual processing that underlies semantics, it tells us little about the nature of this processing. While mapping concepts between Marr’s computational and implementation levels to support neural decoding, this approach ignores Marr’s algorithmic level, central for understanding the mechanisms that implement cognition, in general, and conceptual processing, in particular. Following decades of research in cognitive science and neuroscience, what do we know so far about the mechanisms that implement conceptual processing? Most basically, much is known about the mechanisms associated with: (1) features and frame structure, (2) grounded, abstract, and linguistic representations, (3) knowledge-based inference, (4) concept composition, and (5) conceptual flexibility. Rather than explaining these fundamental conceptual processes, semantic tiles simply provide a trace of their activity over a relatively short time within a specific context. Establishing the mechanisms that implement conceptual processing in the brain will require more than mapping it to cortical (and sub-cortical) activity, with process models from cognitive science likely to play central roles in specifying mechanisms at the algorithmic level."


 

"What guides situating language processing?"
 
Pia Knoeferle, PhD

Professor of Psycholinguistics

Humboldt University, Germany

Pia Knoeferle

Abstract:
"Situated language processing research has examined the effects of rich contextual information (e.g., of world knowledge and of event depictions) on sentence processing using eye movements in scenes and event-related brain potentials (ERPs). From this research we have learned that all sorts of cues, including rich visual contexts, rapidly inform (expectations in) language comprehension. However, what guides (such context effects on) situated language processing is unclear. I will discuss cognitive biases as one important factor in the causality underlying situated language processing (i.e., the causal relations between language processing, visual attention to objects and events, brain responses, and associated cognitive states) and review first studies that have begun to provide insights into both such causality and cognitive biases."