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Regular version of the site
Bachelor 2019/2020

Chinese Politics Part 2 – China and the World

Type: Elective course (Asian and African Studies)
Area of studies: Asian and African Studies
When: 4 year, 3 module
Mode of studies: Blended
Instructors: Maria Efimenko
Language: English
ECTS credits: 3

Course Syllabus

Abstract

One of the most significant changes in the world in the past 30 years is the opening of China to the outside world and its engagement with that world. In the initial years of the opening, external forces influenced China’s economy, regional balances, bureaucracy, as well as the political authority of local leaders in the coastal areas. More recently, the world is feeling the effects of a rising China which seeks resources and talent from all around the globe and uses its financial wealth to strengthen its position in the world. This course tracks the opening of China up from 1978 until it joins the WTO, focusing on how the world affected China’s internal development. We then look at various aspects of China’s “going out strategy” — its search for energy, talent, as well as its relations with the United States and the states within the Asia-Pacific region. The instructor has been deeply engaged in research on all these topics, having lived in China during various stages of China’s opening to the outside world.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • Course gives a basic understanding on China and the World
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Analyses the process of China’s Opening to the Outside World, 1978-2000
  • Interprets China’s Changing Relations with the World, 2000-2016
  • Analyses China’s Global Search for Energy and Resources
  • Student knows China’s Global Search for Talent and Technology, 1978-2016
  • Demonstrates knowledge of China’s Rise and the World: A Panel Discussion.
  • Discusses China and World.
  • Analyses the role of Chinese leaders in China's growth.
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Module 1: China’s Opening to the Outside World, 1978-2000
    0.1: Introduction to the Course - China and the World 1.1: Explaining China’s Opening to the World, 1978-2000: “Second Image Reversed” and “Relative Prices” 1.2: Explaining China’s Opening to the World, 1978-2000: Linkages, Leaders and Models 1.3: Visualizing China’s Opening: From Autarky to Mercantilism 1.4: Applying the Model to China’s Opening 1.5: Case Study: Rural Joint Ventures and the Local Alliance with International Capital 1.6: Case Study: China’s Decision to Join the World Trade Organization 1.7: Conclusion to the Two Cases
  • Module 2. China’s Changing Relations with the World, 2000-2016
    2.1: International Structure: Realism and Constructivism 2.2 International Political Economy and National Power 2.3 Domestic Politics, Leadership and Foreign Policy 2.4 Sino-US Relations: The Most Important Bi-lateral Relationship in the World 2.5 Sino-Japanese Relations 2.6 Sino-Russian Relations 2.7 Relations with Taiwan and Hong Kong 2.8 China’s Regional Ties 2.9 China and ASEAN 2.10 China and the Korean Peninsula 2.11 China and Central Asia: The Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO)
  • Module 3: China’s Global Search for Energy and Resources
    3.1 Going Out for Energy and Resources 3.2 China’s Energy Anxiety 3.3 China’s Strategies to Resolve Energy Anxiety 3.4 Key Chinese Actors in Energy Diplomacy and Their Roles 3.5 Key Actors Outside the Government 3.6 Case Study: Iran – Balancing Energy Needs and Support for Non-Proliferation 3.7 Case Study: Angola – Dealing with an Independent, Neutral and Tough Partner 3.8 Case Study: Australia – Energy Diplomacy with a U.S. Strategic Ally 3.9 Case Study: Australia’s Quixotic Policy Towards China – Trade’s Strategic Significance 3.10 Module Conclusion
  • Module 4: China’s Global Search for Talent and Technology, 1978-2016
    4.1: What Can States Do? 4.2: Explaining China’s Success 4.3 The History of the Policy 4.4: Improving Policy After Tiananmen 4.5: Bringing the Party Back In: The 1000 Talents Program (2002-2008) 4.6: The 1000 Talents Program 4.7: Evaluating 1000 Talents Policy and its Limits 4.8: Case Study: Academics and Universities 4.9: Academics and Universities: Current Reforms 4.10: Case Study: Scientists and the Chinese Academy of Sciences 4.11: The Need for Reform at the Chinese Academy of Sciences 4.12: Case Study: Entrepreneurs and the Municipal Governments 4.13: Entrepreneurs, Technology and the Search for Shortage 4.14: Case Study: The Diaspora Option – Serving China from Abroad 4.15: Module Conclusion
  • Module 5: China’s Rise and the World: A Panel Discussion
    5.1: Introducing the Panel 5.2: External Influences on Chinese Foreign Policy Behaviour 5.3: The Role of China’s Leaders in China’s Rise 5.4: Domestic Politics and Its Influence on Chinese Foreign Policy 5.5: From a Political Economy Perspective, is China’s Rise Changing the World? 5.6: Problems of Misperceptions 5.7: Can China Rise Peacefully? 5.8: Summary on the Panel Discussion
  • Module 7: Debate
    Classroom discussion
  • Module 6: The role of Chinese leaders in China's growth
    6. How, in terms of political economy, China's growth is changing the world
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Test 1
  • non-blocking Test 2
  • non-blocking Test 3
  • non-blocking Test 4
  • non-blocking Test 5
  • non-blocking Debate
    Debates missed by a student for a good reason (illness, scientific or academic trip, participation in a conference, etc., documented to the training office), if agreed with the teacher, may not be taken into account and the weight will be redistributed to all elements of the online course control. The retake of the exam is possible in accordance with the “Regulation on the organization of intermediate certification and ongoing monitoring of student performance at the Higher School of Economics”. Student has to pass the online course once again
  • non-blocking Test 6
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (3 module)
    0.1 * Debate + 0.15 * Test 1 + 0.15 * Test 2 + 0.15 * Test 3 + 0.15 * Test 4 + 0.15 * Test 5 + 0.15 * Test 6
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Macroeconomics, Mankiw N. G., 2010

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Principles of economics, Mankiw N. G., 2012