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Regular version of the site
Master 2020/2021

Research Seminar "Eurasian Political Studies"

Type: Compulsory course (Comparative Politics of Eurasia)
Area of studies: Political Science
When: 2 year, 1, 2 module
Mode of studies: offline
Instructors: András Gál
Master’s programme: Comparative Politics of Eurasia
Language: English
ECTS credits: 2

Course Syllabus

Abstract

This course primarily functions as a workshop for MA thesis writing. The primary objectives of the course are providing a supportive forum for students in their thesis-writing process, and to develop their critical thinking skills by discussing the projects of their peers. Furthermore, exposure to thesis projects situated in various epistemic and methodological traditions will broaden the intellectual horizon of students.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • Goal of the course is to provide students with advanced skills necessary to develop their research projects, conduct field work, summarise and present results
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • students will have a firm position on the general issues related to their thesis projects
  • students will develop in their critical and research design skills
  • students will be equipped with all the necessary logistical skills to complete their thesis projects
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Fundamental features of thesis writing: planning, organizing and writing. From thesis project to PhD proposal
  • Workshop session 1.
  • Workshop session 2.
  • Workshop session 3.
  • Presentation
  • Discussing a project
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Class participation
    In the class participation component, the following qualities can result in a maximal grade: • frequency and concision of class participations • originality of class contribution • connection between preparation materials and class contributions • contribution to class discussion dynamics • participation in maintaining an inspiring class environment
  • non-blocking Presentation of thesis project
    The thesis presentation is based on the student’s thesis proposal or introductory chapter (where applicable). In order to enable an informed discussion in the classroom, students are required to summarize the essential features of their projects in max 600 words and circulate this summary among their peers preceding the session. The presentation shall not exceed 10 minutes and should include: • Research topic and puzzle • Research question • Hypothesis/directional expectations/hunches • Methodological commitments • Data set or data collection procedure • Primarily analysis • Potential contribution
  • non-blocking Discussing an assigned thesis project
    To each presentation, a discussant is assigned, who should read the thesis proposal or introductory chapter and provide constructive feedback in max. 5 minutes. When not presenting and discussing, all students are expected to read all short summaries, and to contribute to the class discussions in an informed and constructive manner.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (2 module)
    0.2 * Class participation + 0.2 * Discussing an assigned thesis project + 0.6 * Presentation of thesis project
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Hancké, B. (2009). Intelligent Research Design : A Guide for Beginning Researchers in the Social Sciences. Oxford: OUP Oxford. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=299002

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Collier, D., & Brady, H. E. (2010). Rethinking Social Inquiry: Diverse Tools, Shared Standards. eScholarship, University of California.
  • Eco, U., Farina, G., & Mongiat Farina, C. (2015). How to Write a Thesis. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=963778
  • King, G. (DE-588)135604311, (DE-627)568593324, (DE-576)166299405, aut. (1994). Designing social inquiry scientific inference in qualitative research Gary King; Robert O. Keohane; Sidney Verba.
  • The Oxford handbook of political methodology / ed. by Janet Box-Steffensmeier . (2008). Oxford [u.a.]: Oxford Univ. Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edswao&AN=edswao.253060168
  • Todd Landman, & Edzia Carvalho. (2017). Issues and Methods in Comparative Politics : An Introduction: Vol. Fourth edition. Routledge.