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Student
Title
Supervisor
Faculty
Educational Programme
Final Grade
Year of Graduation
Peter Adu
Mental Health Literacy, Education, Stigmatization, and Religiosity in Ghana
Applied Social Psychology
(Master’s programme)
2019
Although Mental Health Literacy (MHL) is relatively a new concept, however, research on this concept is growing internationally. The beliefs and knowledge of Ghanaians on specific mental disorders have not yet been explored. This online survey study was conducted to explore the relationships between MHL, Education, Stigmatization, and Religiosity among Ghanaians using a convenient sample (N=409). The adopted questionnaire presented two vignettes (depression and schizophrenia) about a hypothetical person. Participants provided diagnoses for the hypothetical person in the vignettes. Afterwards, participants responded questions on stigma attitudes and religious belief. In general, our study revealed that more participants were able to recognise depression (47.4%) than schizophrenia (15.9%). It was also revealed that religiosity was not significantly associated with recognition of mental disorders (MHL). Nonetheless, religiosity was positively related with both social and personal stigma for depression, but negatively associated with personal and perceived stigma for schizophrenia. Moreover, education was found to relate positively with MHL, and negatively with perceived stigma. Finally, perceived stigma was positively associated with MHL, whereas personal stigma for schizophrenia related negatively to MHL. In conclusion, within a particular sample in Ghana, knowledge and attitudes towards depression and schizophrenia may vary as observed in the differences in recognition rates and attitudes towards these mental disorders. Education could serve as a medium to promote MHL, and to reduce stigma. Findings from this study have implications for MHL and anti-stigma campaigns in Ghana and possibly other developing countries in the region.

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