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Магистратура 2023/2024

Глобальное неравенство в исторической перспективе: введение в глобальную историю

Лучший по критерию «Полезность курса для Вашей будущей карьеры»
Лучший по критерию «Полезность курса для расширения кругозора и разностороннего развития»
Лучший по критерию «Новизна полученных знаний»
Направление: 46.04.01. История
Когда читается: 1-й курс, 3 модуль
Формат изучения: без онлайн-курса
Охват аудитории: для своего кампуса
Прогр. обучения: Глобальная и региональная история
Язык: английский
Кредиты: 3
Контактные часы: 24

Course Syllabus

Abstract

This course gives an introduction to global history from the perspective of the economic anthropology of capitalism. Its aims are to explore key issues and approaches within this field of inquiry from the vantage point of a tension between political-economic (Marxist) and cultural (Weberian) perspectives in the historical and anthropological understanding of global inequalities. Topics of seminars include anthropological critique of the world systems theory, the war and free markets, subaltern modernity, Protestant and “ordinary”ethics, the political economy of state socialism, the social and economic condition of post-modernity, affective labor. This broad insight will be useful for both historians and students from other disciplines. The course is especially designed to give students deep insight into developments of the world between the 18th and 21st centuries.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • To explore key issues and approaches within this field of inquiry from the vantage point of a tension between political-economic (Marxist) and cultural (Weberian) perspectives in the historical and anthropological understanding of global inequalities.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Ability to see the problems and aspects of contemporary life in their interconnectedness (“holistically”)
  • An understanding of how to apply broadly comparativism, anthropological analysis for studying any aspect of social and cultural life, discerning the advantages and disadvantages of ethnographic, systemic, comparativist approaches
  • Skills of reflexive assessment of the scholar’s position in the field, as well as in social studies, among her colleagues; knowing how to adjust these relationships accordingly
  • Familiarity with some of the general historical developments and topics in Western critical and social theory
  • Skills of conference-style discussion
  • Understanding the general importance of cultural and historical contexts, and the ability to identify which contexts are especially necessary to understand the local situation
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Lecture
  • Explaining economic inequalities: Marxism
  • Economic institutions
  • Natural resources and technologies: commons and struggles of communities
  • Class: Contesting class boundaries and identifications
  • Industrialisation: Time, work-discipline and the rhythm of production
  • Home-work: the boundaries between household, family and work
  • Subalternity
  • Protestant ethics
  • Political economy VS culture
  • Affect and affective labour
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Seminar discussions
    Seminar participation is not graded. I will not “count heads” in class. The final exams, however, will include all materials, including seminar discussions of the home readings and films. If you want to pass the course with a good-to-excellent grade, we strongly suggest that you at least listen to the ongoing discussion (podcast style), and take notes. The seminars will also serve you as a friendly environment to practice your academic English speaking skills.
  • non-blocking Essay style open questions
    approximately 200 words in length for each open question.
  • non-blocking Reading Response papers
    2 response papers worth 20% each. Choose and write two response paper of the present program (400-500 words per paper). Each response should refer to at least 2 papers from the list of additional reading (those readings that are NOT marked with an asterisk * in the syllabus). Choose and write two response paper of the present program (400-500 words per paper). Each response should refer to a minimum of 2 texts from the list of additional reading (those readings that are NOT marked with an asterisk * in the syllabus) Submit to dvtereshina@hse.ru at any time before 23:59 on the day of the last class. There are no make-up opportunities for reading responses – they should be done on time. If plagiarism is found in the answers, HSE plagiarism policy takes effect.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • 2023/2024 3rd module
    0.6 * Essay style open questions + 0.4 * Reading Response papers
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Douglass C. North. (1991). Institutions. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.F9F5C9D3
  • Levine, R., Acker, J., Baca-Zinn, M., Collins, P. H., Cox, O., Davis, K., … Wright, E. O. (2006). Social Class and Stratification : Classic Statements and Theoretical Debates (Vol. 2nd ed). Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=634844
  • Marx, K., & Engels, F. (2001). Capital : A Critique of Political Economy. Electric Book Co.
  • Milanović, B. V. (DE-588)129847402, (DE-627)481953531, (DE-576)162238487, aut. (2016). Global inequality a new approach for the age of globalization Branko Milanovic.
  • Streeck, W. (2012). How to Study Contemporary Capitalism? Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.858847CD

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Institutions, institutional change and economic performance, North, D.C., 1990
  • Milanovic, B. (2014). Global Inequality of Opportunity : How Much of Our Income Is Determined By Where We Live?
  • Ostrom, E. (2015). Governing the Commons : The Evolution of Institutions for Collective Action. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1077401
  • Streeck, W., & Thelen, K. (2012). Introduction: institutional change in advanced political economies. Germany, Europe: Univ. Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.4A5C70D1