• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site

Tag "demography"

Age and Money: How Earnings Change with Age in Russia

Age and Money: How Earnings Change with Age in Russia
Last year, HSE Publishing House released The Russian Labour Market through the Prizm of Demography, a monograph edited by Vladimir Gimpelson and Rostislav Kapeliushnikov. IQ.HSE presents an abbreviated excerpt from this paper discussing the relationship between ageing and labour earnings, with reference to related theories and a snapshot of the current gender and age wage dynamics in Russia.

Planning for Babies: How Many Children Russian Families Would Like to Have

Planning for Babies: How Many Children Russian Families Would Like to Have
Over the past quarter-century, the socially accepted reproductive norm has hardly changed in Russia: most people still believe that two children per family is the ideal. The reality, however, is more diverse, and both largeand childfree families are increasingly commonplace. A new study by HSE demographers looks at changes in public opinion in Russia between 1995 and 2019 concerning the optimal number of children in the family.

Children of Perestroika Turned out to Be Tougher than Children of the Sixties

‘The story behind one picture. We found the guys from a picture that was popular in the 1990s and learned about the paths their lives had taken’
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, people around the world have faced an unprecedented crisis. The cataclysm has impacted Russia as well. Who will better deal the hardships—experienced baby boomers, Gen Xers who survived the 1990s, or Gen Yers who have had an easy life?

How Many Children Is Enough?

How Many Children Is Enough?
Most Russians would like to have two children: a boy and a girl. The others fall between the two extremes of either wanting no children (at least for now) or planning to have three or more. Having a large family is often associated with affluence. The reasons for having another child are many, from wishing to strengthen the family bond and teach older children to care for younger siblings to hoping that the maternity subsidy may help the family improve their housing situation. A HSE demographer used data from a sample of 15,000 respondents to study reproductive attitudes in Russia.

Divorce According to Plan: Who Ends Relationships Most Often—And Why

A still from the 1973 Ingmar Bergman film ‘Scenes from a Marriage’
Citing data from Russia’s largest international sampling study, HSE demographers have shown that women are more likely than men to consider divorce and are more determined to end their marriage. They also found that young couples are more likely to be unhappy with their relationship. The report was prepared for the XXI April International Academic Conference on Economic and Social Development at HSE University.

Growing Up across Generations

Growing Up across Generations
Getting an education and a job, leaving the parental home and starting a family are some of the the milestones of growing up. For Russians in their thirties today, these stages do not necessarily follow a pre-set sequence and often overlap. In contrast to their parents, linear and predictable biographies are increasingly rare among Russian millennials, whose lives tend to look more like a patchwork of diverse events than a straight line. Some of these events, especially childbirth, often get postponed until later in life. For young Russians today, having children tends to be the last stage in their own transition to maturity, according to demographer Ekaterina Mitrofanova.