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Regular version of the site

News

STEMatisation of Women: How Gender Stereotypes Can Prevent Women from Having Careers in Knowledge-intensive Industries

Having studied gender imbalances in disciplines such as science, technology, engineering and mathematics, HSE sociologists propose steps to support women in choosing STEM and staying in this field.

Russia’s Economic and Social Development Depends on How It Responds to Technological Challenges

During a plenary session of the HSE XIX April International Academic Conference, participants discussed the technological future of the Russian economy and how it relates to objectives such as speeding up economic growth and improving the quality of life.

How Neurotechnologies Impact Risk Appetite

Researchers from the Higher School of Economics have shown that by stimulating the frontal cortex, a person’s financial risk appetite can be increased temporarily. Their article on the cognitive mechanisms of risky decision-making was published in eNeuro, an international peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Society for Neuroscience.

Scientists Learned to Predict Public Corruption with Neural Networks

Scientists from Higher School of Economics (HSE) and University of Valladolid have developed a neural network prediction model of corruption based on economic and political factors. The results of the research were published in Social Indicators Research.

Co-nonsolvency Explained: Researchers Publish Ground-breaking Findings

Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and the University of Leipzig have created a model which enables the timely and effective prediction of polymer behavior in mixed solvents. This is the first scientific work to explain, using statistical mechanics, the effect of suppression of co-nonsolvency at high pressures. The findings have been published in the journal Soft Matter.

The Soviet Film Revolution

The October Revolution created a new cinema. At first, 'the most important of all arts' struggled to keep up with social transformations and was not yet used as a weapon in the fight for a communist culture. But the mid-1920s, an innovative, cutting-edge film industry had emerged from sources such as theatre, street performance, posters, poetry and circus shows. This industry was able to do what the politicians had failed to achieve, namely trigger a world revolution.

Foreign Investments are Crucial for Positive Return on Exports

Experts at HSE have shown that the foreign direct investment is an important and necessary determinant for positive return on exports. Such companies consequently encounter a higher level of competition in terms of quality and intensity. Research results have been published in the Baltic Journal of Management.

Technological Unemployment

In his book, Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future, futurist Martin Ford warns of 75% unemployment by 2100, as robots will finally defeat humans and half of all existing occupations will disappear. Should we believe it? Prominent Russian economist and deputy director of the HSE Centre for Labour Market Studies Rostislav Kapeliushnikov does not think so. According to his paper 'Is Technological Change a Devourer of Jobs?'', predictions of a 'labour market apocalypse' with mass loss of jobs caused by technological progress are unfounded.

Experiencing Culture Shock

Conscious decision-making and internalized intentions, as opposed to extrinsic influencing factors, are the key to a student’s successful adaption to life in a foreign country. This was confirmed by research carried out by a group of scientists which included Ken Sheldon, Academic Supervisor and Head of the International Laboratory of Positive Psychology of Personality and Motivation at the Higher School of Economics.

Suspicious Other

In many countries, human empowerment – including freedom of expression and action – tends to increase people’s generalised trust in other people, particularly strangers. However, such an increase is usually gradual, reaching its peak in affluent, modernised democracies. In contrast, in countries with below-average levels of development, people, especially educated ones, often demonstrate a lack of trust in strangers, according to HSE researchers.