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Tag "research projects"

International Projects: Post-Imperial Diversities

The National Research University Higher School of Economics and its Center for Historical Research are launching a new research project “Post-imperial diversities – majority-minority relations in the transition from empires to nation-states” (2018-2020). Funded in the framework of the ERA.Net RUS program, the project is implemented by the consortium of HSE - St. Petersburg, the University of Eastern Finland, and the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity at the University of Goettingen. Its overall aim is to study the constitutional politics of ethnic, linguistic, and religious diversity in the transition from empires to post-imperial arrangements following the Russian empire and the Soviet Union.

Ageing Europe: Which Parts of Europe Have the Youngest and Oldest Populations?

Ageing Europe: Which Parts of Europe Have the Youngest and Oldest Populations?
Demographers have created a detailed colour map of population ageing in European countries; a collection of demographic stories, it uses colour coding to indicate the varying stages of population ageing across Europe. By looking at the map, you can easily spot areas with a higher concentration of older people, countries with the youngest populations and the main destinations for workforce flows. The map's author Ilya Kashnitsky comments on some of the demographic stories it tells.   

Only 36.5% of Russian Companies Now Pursuing Intensive Intangible Strategy

Researchers with the HSE International Laboratory of Intangible-driven Economy have developed an approach towards analysing strategies for employing intangibles. In the study, which was published in the journal Management Decision, they discovered that only 36.5% of Russian companies are pursuing an intensive intellectual capital strategy.

Spontaneous Fluctuations of Brain Activity Influence What You See

Luca Iemi from HSE University, jointly with Niko A Busch from Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, have found that the state of excitability of the brain — indexed byspontaneous neural oscillations - biases a person’s subjective perceptual experience, rather than their decision-making strategy. The findings will be published in eNeurounder the title ‘Moment-to-moment fluctuations in neuronal excitability bias subjective perception rather than decision-making’.

STEMatisation of Women: How Gender Stereotypes Can Prevent Women from Having Careers in Knowledge-intensive Industries

STEMatisation of Women: How Gender Stereotypes Can Prevent Women from Having Careers in Knowledge-intensive Industries
Having studied gender imbalances in disciplines such as science, technology, engineering and mathematics, HSE sociologists propose steps to support women in choosing STEM and staying in this field.

Russia’s Economic and Social Development Depends on How It Responds to Technological Challenges

During a plenary session of the HSE XIX April International Academic Conference, participants discussed the technological future of the Russian economy and how it relates to objectives such as speeding up economic growth and improving the quality of life.

How Neurotechnologies Impact Risk Appetite

How Neurotechnologies Impact Risk Appetite
Researchers from the Higher School of Economics have shown that by stimulating the frontal cortex, a person’s financial risk appetite can be increased temporarily. Their article on the cognitive mechanisms of risky decision-making was published in eNeuro, an international peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Society for Neuroscience.

Scientists Learned to Predict Public Corruption with Neural Networks

Scientists Learned to Predict Public Corruption with Neural Networks
Scientists from Higher School of Economics (HSE) and University of Valladolid have developed a neural network prediction model of corruption based on economic and political factors. The results of the research were published in Social Indicators Research.

Co-nonsolvency Explained: Researchers Publish Ground-breaking Findings

Co-nonsolvency Explained: Researchers Publish Ground-breaking Findings
Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and the University of Leipzig have created a model which enables the timely and effective prediction of polymer behavior in mixed solvents. This is the first scientific work to explain, using statistical mechanics, the effect of suppression of co-nonsolvency at high pressures. The findings have been published in the journal Soft Matter.

The Soviet Film Revolution

The Soviet Film Revolution
The October Revolution created a new cinema. At first, 'the most important of all arts' struggled to keep up with social transformations and was not yet used as a weapon in the fight for a communist culture. But the mid-1920s, an innovative, cutting-edge film industry had emerged from sources such as theatre, street performance, posters, poetry and circus shows. This industry was able to do what the politicians had failed to achieve, namely trigger a world revolution.