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Аспирантура 2020/2021

Социологические теории современности

Статус: Курс по выбору
Направление: 39.06.01. Социологические науки
Когда читается: 2-й курс, 1 семестр
Формат изучения: без онлайн-курса
Преподаватели: Рой Чоудхури Арнаб
Язык: английский
Кредиты: 4

Course Syllabus

Abstract

Today, the world over, society is going through many, large socio-economic and political transformations such as globalisation and Neoliberalism, and structural changes in state–society relations and market dynamics. This course uses contemporary sociological theories – which aim to explain these transformations and structural changes in a comparative and historical perspective– to understand the issues that society faces. This course approaches sociological theories and issues in a thematic manner and analyses socio-economic and political macro categories, groups, markers and identities (such as class, race, gender, ethnicity, and nation). It considers how macro, meso, and micro social realities interact and intersect and how these evolve dynamically through periods of stasis and transformations. Using papers published recently in prominent sociology journals (such as Annual Review of Sociology, American Journal of Sociology, and Theory and Society), the course aims to provide students with the tools to apply these theories creatively in conceptualizing, analyzing, and understanding the complex realities of contemporary society. The course is selective.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • To study contemporary texts on sociological theories from prominent sociology journals.
  • To track current developments in sociological theories.
  • To acquire updated knowledge on sociological theories.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • - Learning sociological theories for learning concepts and developing critical analytical power. - Learning updated theories for critical literature review. - Learning to apply this analytical power and conceptual knowledge in debates, discussions and paper/thesis writing.
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • State and Society
    This lecture gives an overview of sociological theories that deal with state theory and state-society relations tracing from classical sociology to more contemporary theories.
  • Empires and Nations
    This lecture gives an overview of the idea of empire and imperial power structure and how that slowly morphed into the notion of state, particularly nation state.
  • Civil Society and Public Sphere
    This lecture gives an overview of the different theories and notions of civil society in transforming political-historical epochs, and the way it is related to the notion of public sphere and democracy.
  • Subjects and Citizens
    This lecture gives an overview of the stages of transformation through which subjects under sovereign powers became rights bearing citizens of the nation states.
  • Globalization and Contemporary Capitalism
    This lecture gives an overview of the various dimensions of globalisation (economic, social, political, and cultural) and how contemporary capitalism functions.
  • Identities part I: Class and Gender
    This lecture gives an overview of the complexities associated with identities and discusses two aspects of that: class and gender.
  • Identities II: Race and Ethnicity
    This lecture gives an overview of the complexities associated with identities and discusses two aspects of that: race and ethnicity.
  • The Postcolonials and the Postcommunists
    This lecture gives an overview of the societies that emerged from colonial and socialist/communist pasts and bears the legacy these ideas in its state and society relations.
  • Neoliberal Capital and the Market
    This lecture gives an overview of various dimensions of Neoliberalism and how the market has become an overwhelming force that is changing power dynamics between state and society.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Final Essay
    Detailed instructions regarding assignments and the evaluation process will be provided by the teacher during the first lecture and eventually through an e-mail to all the students.
  • non-blocking Final Presentation of the essay
    Detailed instructions regarding assignments and the evaluation process will be provided by the teacher during the first lecture and eventually through an e-mail to all the students.
  • non-blocking Participation in regular class discussions (on reading materials).
    Detailed instructions regarding assignments and the evaluation process will be provided by the teacher during the first lecture and eventually through an e-mail to all the students.
  • non-blocking Final Essay
    Detailed instructions regarding assignments and the evaluation process will be provided by the teacher during the first lecture and eventually through an e-mail to all the students.
  • non-blocking Final Presentation of the essay
    Detailed instructions regarding assignments and the evaluation process will be provided by the teacher during the first lecture and eventually through an e-mail to all the students.
  • non-blocking Participation in regular class discussions (on reading materials).
    Detailed instructions regarding assignments and the evaluation process will be provided by the teacher during the first lecture and eventually through an e-mail to all the students.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (1 semester)
    0.5 * Final Essay + 0.2 * Final Presentation of the essay + 0.3 * Participation in regular class discussions (on reading materials).
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Carvalho, B. (2016). The making of the political subject: subjects and territory in the formation of the state. Theory & Society, 45(1), 57–88. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11186-016-9264-0
  • Ferguson, J. (2010). The Uses of Neoliberalism. Antipode, 41, 166–184. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00721.x
  • Harvey, D. (2006). Neo-Liberalism as Creative Destruction. Geografiska Annaler Series B: Human Geography, 88(2), 145–158. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.0435-3684.2006.00211.x
  • Lee, C., & Suh, M. (2017). State Building and Religion: Explaining the Diverged Path of Religious Change in Taiwan and South Korea, 1950-1980. American Journal of Sociology, 123(2), 465–509. https://doi.org/10.1086/692728
  • Malešević, S. (2018). Nationalism and the longue durée. Nations & Nationalism, 24(2), 292–299. https://doi.org/10.1111/nana.12410
  • Md Belal Hossain. (2019). Dust Bowls of Empire: Imperialism, Environmental Politics, and the Injustice of ‘Green’ Capitalism. Journal of World-Systems Research, (2), 493. https://doi.org/10.5195/jwsr.2019.935
  • Mezzadra, S. (2011). How many histories of labour? Towards a theory of postcolonial capitalism. Postcolonial Studies, 14(2), 151–170. https://doi.org/10.1080/13688790.2011.563458
  • Mukerji, C. (2011). Jurisdiction, inscription, and state formation: administrative modernism and knowledge regimes. Theory & Society, 40(3), 223–245. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11186-011-9141-9
  • Prasad, M. (2005). Why Is France So French? Culture, Institutions, and Neoliberalism, 1974-1981. American Journal of Sociology, 111(2), 357–407. https://doi.org/10.1086/432778
  • Roche, M. (1987). Citizenship, social theory, and social change. Theory & Society, 16(3), 363. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00139487
  • Rodríguez-Muñiz, M. (2017). Cultivating Consent: Nonstate Leaders and the Orchestration of State Legibility. American Journal of Sociology, 123(2), 385–425. https://doi.org/10.1086/693045
  • Szelenyi, I. (2016). Weber’s theory of domination and post-communist capitalisms. Theory & Society, 45(1), 1–24. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11186-015-9263-6
  • Waters, M. (1991). Collapse and convergence in class theory. Theory & Society, 20(2), 141–197. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00160181

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Crompton, R. (1989). Class theory and gender. British Journal of Sociology, 40(4), 565–587. https://doi.org/10.2307/590889
  • Harrisson, A. P., & Kyed, H. M. (2019). Ceasefire State-Making and Justice Provision by Ethnic Armed Groups in Southeast Myanmar. SOJOURN: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia, 34(2), 290–236. https://doi.org/10.1355/sj34-2c
  • Majumdar, B. (2013). Citizen or Subject? Blurring Boundaries, Claiming Space: Indians in Colonial South Africa. Journal of Historical Sociology, 26(4), 479–502. https://doi.org/10.1111/johs.12020
  • Meier, H. (2016). Global Civil Society from Hyperlink Perspective: Exploring the Website Networks of International NGOs. Journal of Contemporary Eastern Asia, 15(1), 64–77. https://doi.org/10.17477/jcea.2016.15.1.064
  • Samaddar, R. (2015). Zones, corridors, and postcolonial capitalism. Postcolonial Studies, 18(2), 208–221. https://doi.org/10.1080/13688790.2015.1044488
  • Van Den Berghe, P. L. (1978). Race and ethnicity: a sociobiological perspective. Ethnic & Racial Studies, 1(4), 401. https://doi.org/10.1080/01419870.1978.9993241