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Major (East Asian Studies)

Chinese Studies

A dragon in Chinese culture is the symbol of ‘yang’- the positive force. However, China is often depicted in Western mass media as a European dragon, especially if the article or news item is devoted to the country’s economy and foreign policy.

The role of China in East Asia, as well as its position as a global player, cannot be overstated. China and India are the only countries in the world with populations of over one billion people: people living in these two countries account for 40% of the world’s population. In the next two decades, China could very well become the world’s largest economy, whereas India could be the third largest. Furthermore, currently one fifth of the planet speaks Chinese. It should be noted, however, that the majority of Chinese people speak different dialects. However, the official dialect of Chinese language – Mandarin – is taught in primary and middle schools in the Peoples’ Republic of China.

Conceptually, both economic and political relations between Russia and China can be considered a strategic partnership and, at the same time, a strategic rivalry. The correlation dynamics between ‘partnership’ and ‘rivalry’ predetermines the complexity and fluctuations in Russian-Chinese relations – when joint success coexists with mutual claims [The Symbiotic China-Russia Partnership: Cautious Riser and Desperate Challenger, The Chinese Journal of International Politics, Volume 10, Issue 3, 1 September 2017, Pages 299–329]. The strategic nature of such cooperation, as well as subsequent rivalry, results from the fact that Russia and China share the longest border in the world. In terms of culture and civilization, China and Russia belong to two different worlds, which means maintaining bilateral relations is a very complicated, but also a vital and challenging task.

In 2016, Russia was China’s ninth largest trading partner, while China was Russia’s second largest. For many eastern regions of Russia, China is their main trading partner, and its influence has become a major factor in the well-being of the local population. Siberia and the Far East represent about three thirds of the total exports from Russia to China and approximately one fourth of Russian imports to China. We can safely assume that, over the coming years and decades, the dynamics of relations between Russia and China is likely to change and become more complicated. In light of this, in-depth studies of China are of vital importance for Russia.

Those majoring in Chinese studies under the ‘Economics and Politics in Asia’ programme will obtain solid knowledge in such key fields as the economics, business, politics and international affairs of contemporary China, as well as develop an understanding of the country's rich history and diverse culture.

All language courses are taught by highly qualified, experienced teachers and native speakers. A specially developed method for learning the Chinese language will allow graduates not only to pass Levels 5 or 6 of the Chinese language proficiency test (HSK), but also develop the ability to conduct consecutive and simultaneous interpretation and read specialized literature in Chinese.

The tiger is the national symbol of the Republic of Korea because the peninsula's shape is rendered in the image of a lying tiger. Korea is also referred to as an ‘Asian tiger’, which characterizes its economic growth.

Korean Studies

 Despite the fact that, in terms of territory, the Republic of Korea is significantly smaller compared to other countries in the Far East, South Korea is a leading economy of the region. The country’s remarkable leap from poverty and devastation to prosperity and economic advancement took 50 years and it was the product of the hard work and perseverance of the Korean people. As a result of this rapid growth, the Republic of Korea has been transformed into a major player on the world stage.

The intensive development and growth of South Korea has a major impact, not only on its political and economic spheres, but also on its educational system and culture. The phenomenon of the ‘Korean Wave’ has affected not only contemporary Korean culture, but has had a global effect. There's hardly anyone who is not familiar with such Korean brands as Samsung, LG, Hyundai or Kia, and almost everyone has tried Korean cuisine and has watched Korean films or TV shows.

The political and economic strategy of the Republic of Korea aimed at expanding external relations requires more specialists in Korean studies from those countries, which are actively developing ties with South Korea. Also, in terms of economic relations, educational and cultural exchange, Russia is a strategic partner of South Korea, and vice versa. Therefore, demand for highly-qualified Russian specialists with in-depth professional knowledge of the region and who are fluent in the Korean language is constantly increasing. There also is a steady demand for experts who are able to analyze the situation on the Korean peninsula and can help to build bilateral and multilateral relations between Russia, the Republic of Korea and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

Those student majoring in Korean studies as part of the ‘Economics and Politics in Asia’ programme have a unique opportunity to study the economic and political systems of the countries on the Korean peninsula, their historical and cultural heritage, as well as a chance to be become fluent in Korean. The programme is unique in that its graduates will be capable of exploring the country from the inside by studying at South Korea’s leading university.

All language courses are taught by highly qualified, experienced teachers and native speakers. In particular, a specially developed method for learning Korean allows graduates not only to pass Levels 5 or 6 of Korean language proficiency test (TOPIK), but also cultivate the ability to conduct consecutive and simultaneous interpretation and read specialized literature in Korean. 

It is not by chance that the Japanese crane (tanchōzuru) is considered the symbol of the Japanese people. Japanese people associate the patch of red bare skin on the crown of the Japanese crane with the country’s flag. Cranes in V formation symbolize the flying geese paradigm (FGP), developed by Japanese scholars, which explains the so-called ‘chase’ of many Asian countries after Japan and further dynamic economic growth.

Japanese Studies

For decades Japan has played a leading role in the region as the second largest economy in the world behind the USA. In the next 20 years, China may become the world’s largest economy, whereas India could be the third largest. In this respect, what role would a prosperous Japan play in the region? What is the future of multilateral relations between Japan, South Korea and China with respect to their past history?

It is well known that relations between Russia and Japan have long been contentious. For instance, to date Russia and Japan have not signed a peace treaty, and this has been major stumbling block to bilateral cooperation. On the other hand, the 21st century has seen the emergence of new opportunities to settle these differences and improve political, trade and economic relations. For instance, the agreements reached by the leaders of the two countries during their most recent meetings are a clear indication of this.

The idea put forward in the ‘Japan-Russia Action Plan’ of 2003, whereby investment and overall trade between Russia and Japan are far from its maximum potential is still relevant today.

Further growth of investment and trade faces a number of problems. In particular, the Russian business community generally lacks expertise and knowledge regarding the peculiarities of Japanese business, as well as the specifics of business etiquette in Asia.

The major in Japanese studies within the ‘Economics and Politics in Asia’ programme encompasses such fields as economics, politics, international affairs, sociology, business and Japanese history, as well as studies of the country’s demographics and culture.

All language courses are taught by highly-qualified, experienced teachers and native speakers. A specially developed method for learning the Japanese language will allow graduates not only to pass N-1 or N-2 Levels of the Japanese language proficiency test (JPLT), but also to develop the ability to conduct consecutive and simultaneous interpretation and read specialized literature in Japanese.

Minor (Global Business / International Relations)

Global Business 

Companies now must compete in both domestic and global markets and, therefore, they need professionals with internationally recognized qualifications. The ‘Global Business’ Minor gives graduates a competitive advantage in recruitment and career development in domestic and global enterprises. It also provides a unique opportunity to study the peculiarities of doing business in one of the most important and fastest growing economic regions in the world – Asia.

International Relations

The Minor in IR offers students an opportunity to gain more knowledge about the contemporary system of international relations, understand the logic of development with respect to the most important processes in the global economy and international affairs, and build their analytical skills. Furthermore, the Minor provides a unique opportunity to listen to the points of view of leading professors from Asian universities about current trends in international relations in Asia, which are becoming increasingly relevant. Furthermore, the Minor in IR gives graduates a competitive advantage in recruitment and career development in the public sector with respect to the following areas: governmental, semi-governmental, nongovernmental, international organizations and mass media (both domestic and international).