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Regular version of the site

Applied Social Psychology Programme Welcomes Ghanaian Student

Although it took some time to adjust initially, after only a short period studying in HSE’s Applied Social Psychology programme, Ghana native Ebenezer Yao Wepari is certain that attending HSE has been among the best decisions he has made in life.

‘Upon arrival, I found myself in a different culture where I had to pay attention to certain relevant details. For a few weeks after my arrival, the situation became normal as I began to adjust to the new environment and especially the use of Metro to travel to various destinations in Moscow’, he said regarding his experience adapting to life in Russia’s capital. ‘As a first timer in Europe, I find it surprising to see the depth of the underground Metros and the beautifully constructed hundreds of stations underneath’.

A graduate of the University of Ghana, Legon with a degree in psychology, Wepari recalled one of his first classes at HSE during which he introduced himself and spoke about his culture.

‘It was amazing to be in that class’, he said. ‘People who followed me on social media asked me to introduce and share how they could have access to such an opportunity. I am almost an admissions consultant or assistant to them. I recommended HSE based on my experience so far and the benefits at hand’.

At HSE Moscow, one of Wepari’s favourite courses has been Cross-cultural Psychology of Organizational Behaviour. ‘It has allowed me to gain an understanding of how culture affects our daily business practices and what is considered when hiring applicants to a specific organization’, he said. 

Following graduation from HSE, Wepari intends to pursue a career related to socioeconomics and politics, using his training in psychology to better understand the phenomenon of social deprivation.

See also:

HSE University Succeeds in Measuring Impostor Syndrome

Very little attention has been paid to the impostor syndrome phenomenon in Russian scientific literature. Moreover, until now, no Russian-language methodology has been tested to measure the severity of impostor syndrome. This situation has been rectified by scientists from HSE University and the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA).

Life Satisfaction among Young People Linked to Collectivism

The values of collectivism remain important for young people. They promote a sense of loyalty to family and a willingness to accept support from loved ones. Young people who value mutual assistance and a close relationship with others are more satisfied with life, regardless of whether they belong to a collectivist or individualist type of culture.

Intercultural Awareness through the Looking Glass

Dr Anatoly Kharkhurin joined HSE University in 2019 as an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Social Sciences. He received his PhD in Experimental Psychology from the City University of New York and taught in the United States and the United Arab Emirates. This academic year he is teaching Psychology of Thinking and Reasoning and Psycholinguistics. Dr Kharkhurin shared with The HSE Look his perspective on the prospects for the digital transformation of social communication.

Loving-Kindness Mediation Will Make You Happier Than Compassion Meditation

Researchers from HSE University compared the effect of two meditation practices – loving-kindness meditation (LKM) and compassion meditation (CM). Loving-kindness meditation turned out to be more effective when it comes to increasing happiness, but, in contrast with previous studies, compassion meditation also did not result in a growth of negative emotions. The paper was published in Mindfulness journal.

Neural Networks Can Now Make Personality Judgments Based on Our Photographs

Many people are able to recognize the personality traits of the person they are talking to by their facial features. Experts in non-verbal communication can do this even with a photograph. But is it possible to teach artificial intelligence to do the same?

Burning Out in Silence: Why Muting Dissent at Work is Dangerous

Russian companies still pursue authoritarian leadership styles, and employees often avoid articulating their concerns and complaints to management. Together with chronic stress and work-family imbalance, this can often result in emotional burnout. This is the conclusion of a study by researchers from North Dakota State University (USA) and HSE University.

A Disadvantaged Start: How Childhood Poverty Affects Self-confidence in Adulthood

In 2017, 30% of Russian families with children under three and almost 20% of families with children under 18 were living below the poverty line. Incidentally, financial hardships experienced during childhood do not leave one unaffected. A study by an HSE psychologist shows that poverty experienced in childhood reduces self-esteem and self-assurance even in adults who later achieve financial success.

Emotions Help Engage School Students in Learning

Psychology researchers from HSE University have trialed the reliability of a student engagement scale on 537 Russian primary school students. The findings indicated that the emotional component contributes the most to school engagement. The paper has been published in PLOS ONE journal.

An Everyday Evil: The Spread of Adolescent Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying is a fact of life for many teens today. Psychologists have found that with age, people become inured to acts of aggression. However, cyber harassment is one of the most dangerous forms of bullying. Cyberbullying victims have nowhere to hide, while their parents often have no idea that something bad is happening to their kids, since the bullying occurs in adolescent online communities. Researchers studied cyberbullying among teenagers.

Defending Personal Boundaries: How Birth Order Affects Children’s Psychological Sovereignty

HSE psychologists have studied how the presence or absence of siblings, as well as birth order, affect children’s ability to maintainpersonal boundaries. The results showed that only children and second-born children have the strongest sense of personal boundaries, while first-born children have the least. However, as children become adults, their ability to balance between their own needs and those of others becomes determined more by gender.