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Бакалавриат 2023/2024

Политика в области устойчивого развития

Статус: Курс по выбору (Политология и мировая политика)
Направление: 41.03.04. Политология
Когда читается: 3-й курс, 3 модуль
Формат изучения: без онлайн-курса
Охват аудитории: для своего кампуса
Преподаватели: Чекаленко Анатолие
Язык: английский
Кредиты: 4
Контактные часы: 40

Course Syllabus

Abstract

The "Politics of Sustainable Development" course offers an integrated exploration of the theoretical underpinnings and diverse conceptions of "sustainable development." This interdisciplinary program emphasizes the complex sustainability challenges faced by both industrial and developing nations, alongside economies in transition. Key elements of the course include: • Examination of sustainability issues in industrial countries, such as aging populations, sustainable consumption, and institutional adjustments. • Analysis of challenges in developing states and transitioning economies, including managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, and pressures from population changes. • Exploration of the sociology of knowledge regarding sustainability, focusing on its economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. • Consideration of the implications of these issues for the political constitution of economic performance. Through lectures, case studies, and policy debates, the course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of global environmental governance and cooperation. It addresses the role of multinational corporations, small businesses, and consumers in environmental issues and the complexity of creating effective governance regimes amid diverse political and economic powers. This multifaceted approach enables students to critically analyze the interplay between natural, societal, and economic systems and their impact on international relations and development. The course prepares students to navigate and contribute to the evolving field of sustainable development, equipping them with both theoretical insights and practical skills.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • • Familiarise the students with foundations of the conceptual framework of Sustainable Development
  • • Understanding the goals and objectives of the policy, how it is developing, what are consequences of both progressive and conservative policies
  • • Comparing the experience of both developed and developing countries with SD policies
  • • Understanding the new methods of sustainable development analysis
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Analyzes and calculates the economic consequences of ecological problems
  • Makes the projections for the social economic consequences of the different models of environment development and vise-versa
  • Understands the role of different actors in the sustainable development policy promotion and advocacy
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Week 1. Definitions and Design: What is Sustainable Development?
  • Week 2. Introduction to Sustainability: Political Economy, Science & Policy
  • Week 3. Problem Structure
  • Week 4. Sustainable Development Goals
  • Week 5. Collective Action and International Regimes
  • Week 6. Climate Cooperation
  • Week 7. States, Domestic Political Institutions, and Policymaking
  • Week 8. Methods and Conceptual Considerations
  • Week 9. Contributing to Sustainability
  • Week 10. Group Presentation of Final project
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Seminar participation (20%)
    Criteria of engagement ● Meaningful engagement with the mandatory readings demonstrated ● Own critical approach to the reading and lecture materials elucidated ● By bringing in concepts and empirical examples from other fields of study, the student demonstrates a complex understanding of the introduced concepts ● Contribution to the class dynamics: by reflecting on earlier points and comments, students can again demonstrate a practical understanding of the discussed concepts, as well as their abilities to understand the dynamics of ongoing discussions. Conversely, redundant and self-serving comments will lower the participation grade.
  • non-blocking Individual tasks (10%)
    Based on the skills acquired at the workshop, students will receive home assignments to work in Excel, Powerpoint, etc.
  • non-blocking Case Study (10%)
    This is an editorial assignment of 500 to 750 words – with a strict word limit (note your final word count at the end of the submitted work with your name). Your task is to construct an argument around some aspect of a specific case of unsustainable development. This should not be a summary, but an analysis that references course material when appropriate. The important point is that you construct a political argument about an issue of sustainable development using ample supporting evidence and examples. This is not merely an opinion piece, then; it is a well-reasoned argument that mimics the best of editorial pages in national publications, i.e. here’s an example.
  • non-blocking Team presentation (20%)
    A 15-minute presentation (plus an additional five minutes of discussion time) of a sustainability case study counts for 10% of your final grade. As part of the presentation, you must prepare an analysis of one of the cases or practices of sustainable development (after agreeing with me in advance). Examples of presentation areas: 1. Comparative analysis of the level of development of sustainable development practices in the countries of the global South and North (select at least 3-4 countries). 2. The role of business in the sustainable development of Russian cities (using the example of 3-4 companies) 3. The role of the state in developing the climate agenda (at least 3-4 countries in Asia, Latin America or the Middle East) 4. The role of non-state actors in the development of corporate social responsibility practices (3-4 examples) 4. Development of non-financial reporting standards (using the example of 3-4 countries of the Global South) 5. Analysis of projects of companies to protect human rights (3-4 companies minimum). After presenting your material, you will generate critical discussion among your peers, particularly by preparing at least two interesting questions that will prompt further exploration of the work and relate to other aspects of the course.
  • non-blocking Final test (20%)
    The test makes up 20% of the final grade. It consists of two parts and lasts 1 hour 20 minutes. Part one is a simple one correct answer quiz. Part two consists of open questions where students have to demonstrate their deeper knowledge of the subject.
  • non-blocking Exam (20%)
    The exam makes up 20% of the final grade. It consists of two parts and lasts 1 hour 20 minutes. Part one is a simple one correct answer quiz. Part two consists of open questions where students have to demonstrate their deeper knowledge of the subject. The exam is not compulsory for those students who have achieved above a grade 4 for the other forms of control.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • 2023/2024 3rd module
    0.1 * Case Study (10%) + 0.2 * Exam (20%) + 0.2 * Final test (20%) + 0.1 * Individual tasks (10%) + 0.2 * Seminar participation (20%) + 0.2 * Team presentation (20%)
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Garrett Hardin. (1968). The tragedy of the commons. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.38C4A353
  • Ostrom, E. (1990). Governing the Commons : The Evolution of Institutions for Collective Action. Cambridge: Cambridge eText. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=510979

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Our common future : [Brundtland-Report] / World Commission on Environment and Development. Chairman: Gro Harlem Brundtland (Norway) . (1987). Oxford [u.a.]: Oxford Univ. Pr. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edswao&AN=edswao.049933515